Showing posts with label CHRISTINE MCVIE 2022. Show all posts
Showing posts with label CHRISTINE MCVIE 2022. Show all posts

Saturday, August 27, 2022

NEW Christine McVie - Songbird (Official Music Video)

On Friday, August 26th, Christine dropped the official video for "Songbird" the orchestral version from her new solo compilation "Songbird". It's an animated video, she doesn't appear in it, but it's cool. I love the M.C. Escher influence with the birds.



Wednesday, July 06, 2022

CHRISTINE MCVIE Interview with BBC Radio Scotland on 'Songbird'

Christine Mcvie was interviewed by: Nicola Meighanon on BBC Radio Scotland and talked about her new solo collection 'Songbird'.



Monday, July 04, 2022

Heartbreak and Harmonies - Christine McVie Interview in UNCUT

From the Birmingham blues scene to Hamburg’s Star-Club, communal living, and the world’s arenas, CHRISTINE McVie brought elegance and propriety – as well as considerable songwriting expertise – to FLEETWOOD MAC. 

But will a new compilation showcasing her solo work provide a suitably graceful cap to her storied career? “This may be my swan song,” she confides to Michael Bonner





Taken from the August, 2022 Magazine "UNCUT"


Friday, June 17, 2022

Christine McVie Releases Orchestral 'Songbird' and discusses Fleetwood Mac's Future

Christine McVie On Her New Solo Collection ‘Songbird,’ Uncertain Future of Fleetwood Mac
Listen to her new version of the 1976 Fleetwood Mac classic “Songbird” where the original vocal track has been paired with a new string arrangement



By ANDY GREENE 

Christine McVie has spent the vast majority of her professional career in Fleetwood Mac, but she did take a brief break in 1984 to record Christine McVie and followed it up 20 years later with In the Meantime. This solo material is largely unknown to the general public — especially in America — but she hopes to change that on June 24 with the release of Songbird (A Solo Collection). It’s a mixture of songs from her two solo albums plus a handful of unreleased songs, including “All You Gotta Do,” a duet with George Hawkins originally cut for In the Meantime.

Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham maintained active solo careers during their time in Fleetwood Mac, but McVie says she never really had that desire. “I’ve never felt like I was a solo artist,” McVie tells Rolling Stone from her London home. “I always liked to be part of a group. I also felt a little ill at ease doing a solo tour for that material. It just made me uneasy.”

For the new collection, McVie “went for my favorite songs that weren’t on Fleetwood Mac records,” working with producer Glyn Johns and redoing the tracks with extra instrumentation.

“The Challenge” from McVie’s self-titled 1984 album features backing vocals by Buckingham and guitar by Eric Clapton. “I clearly remember asking Eric to play on it,” McVie says. “And to my delight, he agreed. Like all of my songs, it’s about life and remorse and rejection.”

A majority of the Songbird (A Solo Collection) songs come from 2004’s In the Meantime. She released the album a few years after parting ways with Fleetwood Mac and retreating to her home in the English countryside. It peaked at #133 in the UK and didn’t even ding the U.S. charts. “I really like that record,” says McVie. “I think it wasn’t advertised as well as it could have been.”

The lone Fleetwood Mac song on the record is her 1976 ballad “Songbird,” and it’s a new rendition that pairs her original vocal track with a new string arrangement by composer and arranger Vince Mendoza. Check out the song right here:




Fleetwood Mac have been completely inactive since the conclusion of their 2018/19 world tour. It was their first outing since their bitter split with Buckingham, when he was replaced by Crowded House frontman Neil Finn and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell. “Those guys were great,” McVie says. “We have a great time with them, but we’ve kind of broke up now, so I hardly ever see them.”

“I don’t communicate with Stevie [Nicks] very much either,” she says. “When we were on the last tour, we did a lot. We always sat next to each other on the plane and we got on really well. But since the band broke up, I’ve not been speaking to her at all.”

Does she mean to say that Fleetwood Mac no longer exists? “Well, not as we know it,” McVie says. “I don’t know. It’s impossible to say. We might get back together, but I just couldn’t say for sure.”

Mick Fleetwood has been open about his hopes to see the Rumours-lineup come back together for a grand farewell tour, but McVie is highly dubious. “I don’t feel physically up for it,” she says. “I’m in quite bad health. I’ve got a chronic back problem which debilitates me. I stand up to play the piano, so I don’t know if I could actually physically do it. What’s that saying? The mind is willing, but the flesh is weak.”

In theory, McVie could sit at the keyboard to make it easier for her to get through a show, but she says that wouldn’t work in practice. “I couldn’t sit at the rig I play,” she says. “You have to stand up to play the piano and the Hammond Organ is beneath that, so it’s a bit difficult to think about sitting down and doing it. Anyway, I wouldn’t want to do that.”

According to McVie, bassist John McVie is in a similar predicament. “I don’t think John’s up for another tour,” she says. “He’s got health issues, so I don’t know if he would be up for it. You’d have to ask him.”

If a tour does somehow happen, McVie hopes that they’ll find a way to bring Buckingham back into the fold. “I’d always want Lindsey back,” she says. “He’s the best. Neil and Mike were such a cheerful couple, but Lindsey was missed.”

“But I’m getting a bit long in the teeth here,” she continues. “I’m quite happy being at home. I don’t know if I ever want to tour again. It’s bloody hard work.”

This may disappoint Fleetwood Mac’s legions of fans, not to mention some of her own bandmates, but they’ll be relieved to know she’s not closing the door on a tour completely. “I really can’t say for sure,” she says, “because I could be wrong. So I’ll just leave it open and say that we might.”

Saturday, June 11, 2022

FLEETWOOD MAC'S CHRISTINE MCVIE ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS

As her solo material is compiled, the singer and writer of hits including Little Lies and Everywhere will take on your queries




Fleetwood Mac’s songs span the full range of human emotion and pop expression, but the chances are that if you’ve danced to one at a wedding, it was written by Christine McVie. Everywhere, Little Lies, Don’t Stop, You Make Loving Fun – the band’s greatest joie de vivre was invariably channelled by her. And as her solo material is reissued on a new compilation this month, she joins us to answer your questions about her remarkable career – post them in the comments below.

McVie was grounded in the British blues scene of the mid-60s, duetting with Spencer Davis while studying at art school in Birmingham and playing in a local band, Sounds of Blue. She had a Top 20 hit with her next group, Chicken Shack, singing a cover of I’d Rather Go Blind, and came into the orbit of another set of British blues stars, Fleetwood Mac.

She married bassist John McVie, and started to add details to the band’s recordings: piano, backing vocals, and even the cover art for their fourth studio album Kiln House. She became a full member with 1971’s Future Games, and – amid a period of both great productivity and flux for the band – started to point them towards the pop-rock for which they would become globally famous. Her signature bright poignancy lights up McVie-penned songs such as Spare Me a Little of Your Love from Bare Trees (1972), Remember Me from Penguin (1973), and Just Crazy Love from Mystery to Me (1973), and she took lead vocal duties alongside Danny Kirwan and Bob Welch during this period.

The band settled into their imperial phase with the inclusion of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks who would share lead vocals with McVie, though their early hits in this lineup were still coming from McVie herself: her songs Over My Head and Say You Love Me both reached the US Top 20. The band went supernova with 1977’s eternally popular Rumours, with four McVie numbers – Don’t Stop, Songbird, You Making Loving Fun and Oh Daddy, plus the co-written The Chain – appearing on what has become one of the 10 biggest-selling albums of all time.

She was embroiled in the notorious emotional upheavals around the album – You Make Loving Fun was about an affair she was having with the band’s lighting director – and she and John McVie divorced, though the band continued with the pair of them. McVie got engaged to Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson, released a successful solo album in 1984, and then cemented Fleetwood Mac’s next superstar phase by writing two huge hit singles, Everywhere and Little Lies, for the 1987 album Tango in the Night, the latter with her new husband Eddy Quintela (they later divorced in 2003).

Aside from a brief mid-90s hiatus, the band have pressed ever onwards, though McVie took a long break between 1998 and 2014, before returning to a delirious reception for a Fleetwood Mac concert at London’s O2 Arena in 2015, and touring with the band ever since. Her solo material has sometimes been overlooked amid the stadium success of her main band, but gets a new outing this month with the compilation Songbird, which includes a new orchestral version of the title track, old solo tracks featuring Steve Winwood and Eric Clapton, highlights from 2004 album In the Meantime and two previously unreleased songs: Slow Down and All You Gotta Do.

Ahead of its release on 24 June, McVie, now 78, will answer your questions about her life and career – post them below and she’ll take on as many as possible. 


Fleetwood Mac’s Christine McVie: ‘Cocaine and champagne made me perform better’

As she releases a compilation of her solo work, the writer and singer of some of Fleetwood Mac’s biggest hits answers your questions on excess, infighting and Joe Cocker joining her wedding night

The UK blues and rock scene of the late 1960s was a very male-focused, testosterone-heavy environment. Did you ever consider yourself a groundbreaker for moving into that world? GeoffWhit

In those days, there were very few women, especially playing the blues, but I never felt singled out. It just all came very naturally to me when I was with Chicken Shack and things started happening for them. Shortly after that I met Fleetwood Mac. It just all fell into place and was really fantastic. Not too many women have said, “Thanks for groundbreaking”, to be honest. I’m sure I was appreciated, but it wasn’t hero worship or anything like that. Can you tell them to start [laughs]?

I first saw you with Chicken Shack at the Toby Jug at Tolworth in ’68/’69. Some astonishingly big names from rock and blues [among them Led Zeppelin, and David Bowie launching the Ziggy Stardust tour] appeared in the pub. Do you have any special memories from that small circuit? IDNumNoLongerWorks

I remember that place! We played there a few times and it was a pretty great gig. The atmosphere was phenomenal. In a small club, the sweat is palpable. It was such a great, friendly vibe and we thoroughly enjoyed playing in them. I wonder if we enjoyed it slightly less playing in much bigger places. Playing to thousands of people is more daunting, but you get used to it in the end. After the first 20 rows they all disappear anyway.

It wasn’t really a honeymoon. We just got married locally because my mother was sick. Oddly enough, there was that famously husky-voiced singer … Joe Cocker! He was staying at the same hotel and he got plastered with us, on our wedding night! Until we kicked him out [laughs].

What are your memories about joining Fleetwood Mac, after the departure of Peter Green? Skysaxon

Chicken Shack used to open for them. I got to know John, fell in love with him and it was just sensational and exciting. Fleetwood Mac were fantastic and really funny. The biggest joker was probably Peter Green, but they all had a very copacetic sense of humour with each other. It was heartbreaking for them when Peter left. They were rehearsing at Kiln House [Hampshire], and I was down there with all the wives. They came out of the rehearsal room and said: “Hey Chris, do you want to join?” I couldn’t believe my luck. I said: “Are you serious?! I’m just a girl who plays piano.” The style had to change because I was a keyboard player, and it developed a more commercial bent. It was thrilling, and I have to say to this day it still kind of is, knowing that I did that. Then it just got better.

What is your favourite period in Fleetwood Mac’s history and why? JohnB11

I would be silly not to say the Stevie [Nicks] and Lindsey [Buckingham] era, because that was pretty sensational. We had our fights here and there, but there was nothing like the music or the intensity onstage. We weren’t doing anything in Britain, so just decamped to America and fell into this huge musical odyssey. Stevie and Lindsey had been playing as a duo, made a great record [Buckingham Nicks], which to this day I really love, but hadn’t got very far. I think it was Mick [Fleetwood] who invited them to meet us. We all met in this Mexican restaurant, drank a few margaritas and decided to give it a go. We all got into this little rehearsal room and it just shot off like firecrackers.

What was it like being at the centre of the Rumours hurricane, with all the drug and relationship issues and stunning creativity? jimd

It’s hard to say because we were looking at it from the inside, but we were having a blast and it felt incredible to us that we were writing those songs. That’s all I can say about it, really.

Fleetwood Mac had a legendary alcohol and drug intake. In Keith Richards’ autobiography, he acknowledges some “blanks” in his memory. Is this the same for you? Mattyjj

No. I have to say I’m not guilt-free in that department but Stevie and I were very careful. The boys used to get provided with cocaine in Heineken bottle tops onstage, but Stevie and I only did the tiny little spoons. I suppose sometimes we got a bit out-there, but we were quite restrained, really. I always took fairly good care of myself. My drug of choice was cocaine and champagne. I didn’t use any other drugs at all. It’s easy for me to say, but I think it made me perform better. Maybe somebody could tell me different [laughs].

Which of the band’s glorious rock-star excesses (grand pianos in hotel suites, demands that hotel rooms be repainted) makes you smile or cringe the most? Mattyjj

I don’t think I ever had a piano in my room. Stevie always did, but she couldn’t play it [laughs]. So she’d have me come down and play. Nothing made me cringe. We all had definite images in the band. Stevie was the Welsh witch. I was mother nature. Mick was the raving lunatic. Everyone was very different, but we all got on, for the most part. In those days it was just all good clean fun. Well, fairly clean fun!

What are your memories of [late Fleetwood Mac guitarist] Danny Kirwan, and did you stay in touch with him over his many lost years? cymbula

No, not really. Danny and I didn’t really gel that well. Without wishing to offend anybody, we just didn’t click, but he was a knockout guitar player and he wrote some fantastic songs. So I do have a lot of respect for him.

Who or what was Sugar Daddy about? GeekLove

I don’t recall it being about anybody. I just dreamed it up. Most of my songs are based on truth, and real people, but a lot of them are just fantasies, really.

Do you regret your [16-year] hiatus [from Fleetwood Mac]? Or was it necessary for your mind and body? Did you think you would come back? Malaprop

I just wanted to embrace being in the English countryside and not have to troop around on the road. I moved to Kent, and I loved being able to walk around the streets, nobody knowing who I was. Then of course I started to miss it. I called Mick and asked: “How would you feel about me coming back to the band?” He got in touch with everybody and we had a band meeting over the phone and they all went: “Come baaaack!!” I felt regenerated and I felt like writing again.

How did you get over your fear of flying? Kmpmilano

One day I just decided not to be afraid of it any more, and that was it! I felt liberated. Then I thought: “I’m actually enjoying this.” Life’s too short to be afraid of things like flying. You’d never go anywhere. I love flying now.

It wasn’t until my 30s that I knew you grew up in the same village as me. Do you still consider yourself Cumbrian or is that a distant memory? GreenNick79

I was born in Greenodd and we lived there for three or four years before moving to Birmingham, where my father was a music teacher. Cumbria is a beautiful part of the world and we had a good time, but my distinct memory is of nearly drowning. I slipped in the mud and fell in the river, and they had to get me out using a fishing net.

Which of the songs that you have written are you most proud of? georgialh

I’ve got to say Songbird. I couldn’t sleep, started to get a song rolling around in my head and I wrote it in half an hour. “For you there’d be no more crying …” It’s sort of like a little prayer for everybody. We went into Zellerbach Hall studios [In Berkeley, California], they got me a bunch of red roses and I sang it alone on the stage.

What interests do you have outside music? appfree

Sailing. I have friends who have a yacht in Portofino, Italy, so sometimes go over there. I’m also a telly freak and like these long sagas. Narcos on Netflix is brilliant. It’s about Pablo Escobar and has a great plot.

Any thoughts on the Mac following in Abba’s footsteps and staging a virtual concert with your own avatars? Gauchiomurphio

I don’t think we’re doing it. It’s a novelty. People would rather see the real people, I’m sure.

Christine McVie’s Songbird (A Solo Collection), featuring two previously unreleased recordings, is released on 24 June and can be preordered now.



Sunday, April 24, 2022

CHRISTINE MCVIE SONGBIRD A SOLO COLLECTION



First Ever Compilation From Rock & Roll Hall Of Famer Highlights Songs From Her Solo Career, Newly Remastered By Glyn Johns, Along With Two Unreleased Studio Recordings

Also Features New Orchestral Version Of Fleetwood Mac Classic “Songbird”

Christine McVie was not only the songwriter and vocalist for many of Fleetwood Mac’s biggest hits (“Don’t Stop,” “Everywhere,” and “Little Lies”), but she also released some stunning solo albums during her Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame career. Rhino puts those recordings center stage on the very first compilation to spotlight McVie as solo artist.

SONGBIRD features songs that were remastered by legendary producer Glyn Johns, who worked closely with McVie on the project. It includes a selection of songs from two of her solo albums – 1984’s CHRISTINE MCVIE and 2004’s IN THE MEANTIME – plus two previously unreleased studio recordings including “Slowdown,” which was originally written for the 1985 film American Flyers.

Another song that has never been released is “All You Gotta Do,” a duet that Christine recorded with George Hawkins while making IN THE MEANTIME. The track was never finished and Johns added Ricky Peterson on Hammond and Ethan Johns on drums and guitar.

Another unreleased song is a new orchestral version of "Songbird" from Fleetwood Mac’s RUMOURS album, which has become one of McVie’s signature tracks. The new version pairs McVie’s iconic vocals from the original recording with a gorgeous new string arrangement by six-time Grammy Award winning composer and arranger Vince Mendoza.

SONGBIRD goes back to 1984 for a selection of tracks from Christine McVie, which find McVie joined by several legendary musicians. “The Challenge” includes backing vocals by her Fleetwood Mac bandmate Lindsey Buckingham and lead guitar by Eric Clapton. “Ask Anybody” is a song McVie co-wrote with Steve Winwood, who also adds backing vocals and piano to the track.

Most of SONGBIRD is taken from 2004’s IN THE MEANTIME. Highlights include the Top 40 AC hit, “Friend” and “Sweet Revenge,” one of several songs on the record that she co-wrote with her nephew Dan Perfect, who also helped produce the album.

The liner notes that accompany SONGBIRD find McVie paired with acclaimed English radio DJ and broadcaster Johnnie Walker for a conversation that touches on every song from the collection.

SONGBIRD (A SOLO COLLECTION)

Track Listing

“Friend”

“Sweet Revenge”

“The Challenge”

“Northern Star”

“Ask Anybody”

“Slowdown” *

“Easy Come, Easy Go”

“Giving It Back”

“All You Gotta Do” *

“Songbird” – Orchestral Version *

* previously unreleased

PRE-ORDER AT AMAZON OR AT RHINO.COM

CD

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Album Chart Debuts:

Christine Album debuted in the UK on two charts, missing the main Top 100 Albums Chart, instead landing on the following charts:

#22 - Official Physical Albums Chart Top 100

#24 - Official Albums Sales Chart Top 100

The album also debuted at #15 in Scotland.

In the US, the album missed the Billboard Top 200 but did impact these two charts:

#49 - Top Current Album Sales

#83 - Top Album Sales







Saturday, March 26, 2022

Christine McVie to release new solo album

Christine McVie to release new solo album of reworked Fleetwood Mac tracks



Christine McVie has shared details of her forthcoming album Songbird, containing a compilation of her biggest hits.

Christine McVie has announced that she will be releasing a new solo album featuring re-imagined versions of her biggest hits with Fleetwood Mac. The album will be titled Songbird, after one of the singer's solo compositions on Rumours.

Although no official release date for the album has yet been confirmed, McVie says it will emerge in June.

Exactly which compositions have been reworked for Songbird has not yet been disclosed. Some of McVie's hits with the group include Say You Love Me, You Make Loving Fun, Everywhere and Little Lies.

According to the vocalist, as disclosed in a new interview with Gary Barlow on BBC Radio 2 show We Write the Songs, the project was produced by legendary English studio veteran Glyn Johns (The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, The Who) and features input from Grammy-winning composer and conductor Vince Mendoza.

“I’ve just finished an album which is a compilation of my biggest hits,” she explains. “But they’ve all been produced again by Glyn Johns [with] Vince Mendoza on strings, who does this fantastic version of Songbird. We’ve just now actually re-cut it with a complete string orchestra and it sounds beautiful.”

McVie says that all the re-imagined Fleetwood Mac songs on the album "sound completely different" to their originals. 

When asked if she would consider touring the album, the singer/keyboardist replies, “That I daren’t comment on yet! I’m very cagey about things like that.”

The Fleetwood Mac star last released a solo album in 2004 with In The Meantime, and issued a joint self-titled project with band-member/guitarist Lindsey Buckingham in 2017.

Discussing her reunion with the band in 2014 following a 16 year hiatus, she explains how she rekindled her relationship with her fellow band members. “I just needed to get away,” she said of her departure in 1998.

“I was quite happy for the first eight, 10 years, just living my life in the country in Kent. I had a big old rambling manor house that I lived in, and I was loving my life. 

"Then I just started to kind of miss the band again, and it was actually me who tackled Mick [Fleetwood] and said, ‘How would you feel if I were to come back?’ And he went and spoke to all the other guys because they’d all been still playing this whole time.

"You can quote Lindsay as having said, ‘Well, she better bloody well mean it. If she wants to come back, she better bloody well stay!’ Or something like that. But I did. I went back, and it was great – those final years were great.”

When host Barlow asks whether Fleetwood Mac's most recent tour was their “lap of honour", McVie disagrees.

"None of us know what’s happening with Fleetwood Mac," she notes. "With COVID and everything else, we’ve got to all of us be very careful. But you know, this is not necessarily the end of the tale, so maybe the lap of honour is yet to come."

By Elizabeth Scarlett