Showing posts with label Stevie Nicks. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Stevie Nicks. Show all posts

Friday, January 01, 2021

Stevie Nicks' 2020 was a "Dreams" come true

 The Year in Music: Stevie Nicks' 2020 was a "Dreams" come true

While 2020 was pretty much a terrible year for everyone -- especially the music industry, which lost billions due to the shutdown of live events -- some artists not only survived, but thrived.  Here's how 2020 was for one of those artists: Stevie Nicks.

"Dreams," the number-one hit that Stevie wrote for Fleetwood Mac in the '70s, became an unexpected phenomenon when an Idaho man named Nathan Apodaca posted a video on TikTok of himself lip-syncing along to it while swigging Ocean Spray Cran-Raspberry juice and riding a skateboard.

TikTok users rushed to post their own versions of the #DreamsChallenge, as did Stevie, Mick Fleetwood and ex-Fleetwood Mac guitarist Lindsey Buckingham.  As a result, "Dreams" re-entered the Billboard chart, climbing to #12, while its parent album, Rumours, returned to the top 10 for the first time in 42 years.

Speaking with CBS Sunday Morning on October 25, Stevie said, "This TikTok thing has kind of blown my mind. I'm happy about it because it seems to have made so many people happy."

Also in 2020, Stevie released a politically charged song called "Show Me the Way," joined Miley Cyrus on a remix of Miley's hit "Midnight Sky" -- which interpolated Stevie's "Edge of Seventeen" -- and was sampled on Dua Lipa's remix album. 

In addition, Stevie put out a live album and concert film, 24 Karat Gold. In December, she closed out the year by selling an 80% stake in her song catalog for an estimated $100 million.

By Andrea Dresdale - AbcNewsRadio

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

Stevie Nicks is this year’s patron saint of dreaming - Slate

The Music Club, 2020
Entry 12: The year in “Dreams.”
By BRITTANY SPANOS - Slate

In Slate’s annual Music Club, Slate music critic Carl Wilson emails with fellow critics—this year, Rolling Stone staff writer Brittany Spanos, New York Times contributor Lindsay Zoladz, and special guests Ann Powers, Jack Hamilton, Chris Molanphy, and Julyssa Lopez—about the year in music.

Hello again Music Clubbers,

First, Lindsay, I absolutely loved Letter to You, especially as a meditation on friends who have died in a year full of loss. It broke my heart and lifted me up in a way only Bruce Springsteen can.

To Ann’s question about musical lineages and what felt completely new, I would be remiss to not bring up one veteran rock star who has had quite the year: Stevie Nicks. The influence of her and Fleetwood Mac has never felt more potent in popular music, while one of the biggest songs she ever wrote for FM had a major comeback. It was the year of “Dreams,” in a year where it felt like we were in a dream deficit.

What was it about “Dreams,” one of many popular singles on Fleetwood Mac’s immensely popular 1977 album Rumours? It was a remarkable song even then, becoming the band’s only No. 1 hit in the United States. It’s one of the more subtle break-up songs on an album filled to the brim with divorce, infidelity, and heartbreak. Nicks’ now signature mysticism builds a quiet storm of her own as she gives a romantic weather report:

Thunder only happens when it’s raining

Players only love you when they’re playing

Women, they will come and they will go

When the rain washes you clean, you’ll know

Growing up, “Dreams” always embodied a certain type of wistful, ’70s nostalgia. It was less about the decade itself, since I did not actually live through the ’70s, but the type of ’70s that was sold to me in Delia’s catalogs, sitcoms, and my own family’s vintage photos. There’s a sun-soaked, bohemian ethereality to that version of the decade, built both by retro revisionism and by the fact that a song like “Dreams” exists.

I noticed that “Dreams” was gaining some traction early during lockdown. This was mostly because I am someone who listens to a lot of Fleetwood Mac and solo Stevie Nicks, no pandemic needed, so it felt surreal to see the song all over TikTok and Spotify’s snitch-y sidebar of what your friends are listening to. On TikTok especially, the content around “Dreams” was so chaotically variant and diverse, it made me tear up to see the song reach so many different kinds of users and content creators. There were the girls in bell bottoms who would roller skate down empty streets to it.

There were the cosplayers, either dressing up as Nicks or writing visual fanfic of what it was like for her ex-boyfriend/bandmate/eternal bandmate Lindsey Buckingham to hear this particular break-up song about him in the studio for the first time.

Of course, because this is TikTok, there were also highly choreographed routines.

Nothing took off outside of TikTok quite like the serene, brain-cleansing footage of user @420doggface208—whose real name is Nathan Apodaca—skateboarding, drinking cranberry juice, and lip-syncing to “Dreams.” This particular video blew up one evening in October (actually while I was on the phone with Stevie Nicks, to briefly flex). Something about it hit our collective consciousness’ need for serenity now. We all aspire to be as pleasantly unbothered as Apodaca is, enjoying his juice and listening to Fleetwood Mac, with a road all to himself and his skateboard. No thunder or rain in sight.

Apodaca’s video became the type of viral moment that could quickly go sour: everyone had their own version and even Ocean Spray had capitalized on the unintentional #sponcon. But it still hasn’t: It became exciting to see it explode, even once the members of Fleetwood Mac recreated the video, with heavy artistic license.

15 Best Remixes Of 2020 #4 "Edge of Midnight (Midnight Sky Remix)" Miley Cyrus & Stevie Nicks

 The 15 Best Remixes Of 2020


4. “Edge Of Midnight (Midnight Sky Remix)” — Miley Cyrus & Stevie Nicks

Mashing Stevie Nicks’ “Edge Of Seventeen” with Miley Cyrus’ “Midnight Sky” is a stroke of genius.

Stevie Nicks lending her voice to Miley Cyrus’ “Midnight Sky” is an intergenerational collaboration for the ages.

- Idolator



2020 In Review: Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks’s brilliant October single “Show Them the Way”

The Boomer Rock Renaissance 2020 Never Saw Coming

Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks’s brilliant October single “Show Them the Way” prays aloud for this generation to find a song that galvanizes its politics as the protest music of her own formative years did.


By Craig Jenkins - Vulture

STEVIE NICKS PARTNERS WITH PRIMARY WAVE MUSIC!

Press Release:

STEVIE NICKS PARTNERS WITH PRIMARY WAVE MUSIC!
THIS NEW PARTNERSHIP WILL SEE THE INDEPENDENT PUBLISHER ACQUIRE A MAJORITY STAKE IN THE LEGENDARY SINGER’S PUBLISHING COPYRIGHTS, AS WELL AS NAME AND LIKENESS SONGS INCLUDE “EDGE OF SEVENTEEN,” “RHIANNON,” “LANDSLIDE” AND “DREAMS”



“The true rock legends change the game. Stevie Nicks, as a member of Fleetwood Mac, and later in her solo career, changed the game not only for women, but for what you could do in rock as a songwriter and a singer.” – NPR

NEW YORK, N.Y. (December 4, 2020) – As her hit song “Dreams” was re-entering the Billboard charts, the iconic singer and songwriter Stevie Nicks and Primary Wave Music were finalizing their partnership that will see Stevie join their family of legendary and iconic songwriters. This partnership continues to prove that Primary Wave is truly a home to the legends in music, furthering a year of incredible acquisitions and partnerships. Named one of the 100 Greatest Songwriters of all Time by Rolling Stone, Stevie Nicks is the only woman to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice – the first time in 1998 as a member of Fleetwood Mac and then again in 2019 as a solo artist. Over the course of her unprecedented career, she has received eight Grammy Award nominations and two American Music Award nominations as a solo artist, as well as another five Grammy nominations and a win for Album of the Year as a member of Fleetwood Mac.

Primary Wave’s partnership with Nicks will see the dynamic publisher acquire a majority stake in her publishing copyrights, as well as representing the Grammy winner in brand alliance and brand marketing opportunities and will partner with Kobalt on administration for the catalog. The deal includes many of her timeless hits as frontwoman for Fleetwood Mac including the platinum hit “Landslide,” the Grammy-nominated “Edge of Seventeen” and “Stand Back,” as well as “Dreams,” which recently saw a resurgence thanks to a viral Tik Tok video posted this October. The song, which was the second single off Fleetwood Mac’s critically acclaimed, 1977 album Rumours, recently went Top 10 on Billboard’s streaming chart, saw another 16 million streams bringing it to over a half-billion plays on Spotify alone, and gave Stevie the #1 spot on Billboard’s Hot 100 Songwriters chart thanks to her writing credit on the classic hit.

Additional terms of the deal include a strategic publishing alliance with the singer that will allow her to sign new songwriters to a joint venture. Stevie will also now have access to Primary Wave’s entire marketing, branding, Broadway, Film/TV, and digital strategy teams, as well as their licensing and synch departments.

Of this new partnership, CEO & Founder of Primary Wave Music Publishing, Larry Mestel said, “To say we’re excited to welcome the incredible Stevie Nicks to the Primary Wave family would be a dramatic understatement. If Primary Wave were starting our company today, Stevie Nicks would be one of the shining pillars, a true legend among legends.” He goes on, “She is a groundbreaking artist, and the longevity of her iconic career comes from writing songs, instantly recognizable and critically acclaimed, that stand the test of time.”

Sheryl Louis, Stevie’s long-time manager, and Jamie Young, her attorney, negotiated the deal on behalf of Stevie Nicks.

Legendary singer, songwriter and storyteller Stevie Nicks is one of rock and roll’s most successful, inimitable, and groundbreaking artists. As a multi-platinum, Grammy Award-winning solo artist and member of Fleetwood Mac, she is the only woman to have been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame twice and has collectively sold more than 140 million albums. Having captivated audiences for decades with her iconic live performances, distinctive songwriting, and constant cultural influence, Nicks continues to be an inspiration and mentor to younger performers. A member of Fleetwood Mac since 1974, the band’s enduring spirit stands for an incredible body of music – including Rumours, one of the best-selling albums of all time – that has connected with generations of people all over the world for more than 50 years. In October 2020, Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold The Concert was released at select cinemas, drive-ins and exhibition spaces around the world for two nights only. The sold-out film offered audiences a virtual front-row seat to the magic Nicks brought on her sold-out 24 Karat Gold Tour. Nicks also recently released her first new music in six years with the song “Show Them The Way” which also featured a stunning Cameron Crowe directed video. The song originally began as a poem and a track she calls “a prayer for people to unite; a prayer for people to get together.”

 

Thursday, December 03, 2020

STEVIE NICKS THE 24 KARAT GOLD TOUR 2-CD/DVD + BLU-RAY AVAILABLE JAN 15, 2021


Stevie Nicks The 24 Karat Gold Concert will finally hit stores on January 15th!

The DVD is packaged along with the 2-CD's that were previously made available either through Target in the US or Amazon everywhere else. Pre-orders are available on Amazon

CD 1:
1. Gold And Braid
2. If Anyone Falls
3. Stop Draggin' My Heart Around
4. Belle Fleur
5. Gypsy
6. Wild Heart / Bella Donna
7. Enchanted
8. New Orleans
9. Starshine
10. Moonlight (A Vampire's Dream)

CD 2:
1. Stand Back
2. Crying In The Night
3. If You Were My Love
4. Gold Dust Woman
5. Edge Of Seventeen
6. Rhiannon
7. Landslide

DVD:
1. Gold And Braid
2. If Anyone Falls
3. Stop Draggin' My Heart Around
4. Belle Fleur
5. Gypsy
6. Wild Heart / Bella Donna
7. Enchanted
8. New Orleans
9. Starshine
10. Moonlight (A Vampire's Dream)
11. Stand Back
12. Crying In The Night
13. If You Were My Love
14. Gold Dust Woman
15. Edge Of Seventeen
16. Rhiannon
17. Landslide


The Blu-ray of the concert will also be released on January 15, 2021. Available now for pre-order at Amazon.

PBS AIRING THE CONCERT

PBS is airing the concert through out the month of December. Check your local listings. They are also offering DVD/CD, 2-LP Gold Vinyl and 11x17 Lithograph Donation Packages. Either individual or as a collection of all three (CD\DVD + Vinyl + 11x17 Lithograph). 

The Lithograph is a PBS Exclusive - a high quality 11x17 lithograph of the 24 Karat Gold Tour theatrical artwork, with gold embossing on the text and a “Superfine white egg-shell” finish, sequentially numbered with gold-foil stamping.






Saturday, November 28, 2020

Stevie Nicks Nicks has been embracing some of the busiest years of her dual careers

Stevie Nicks Answers All Our Questions About Harry Styles

BY KEATON BELL
VOGUE

Of all the disciples to worship at the altar of Stevie Nicks, none have managed to capture the attention of rock’s reigning priestess quite like Harry Styles. 

The 26-year-old rocker (who this week received three Grammy nominations) is the Gucci-clad poster boy carrying the torch for a bygone era of music history that the Fleetwood Mac frontwoman helped crystallize. Styles recently cited the group’s 1977 (and still charting) classic “Dreams” as one of the first songs he learned the words to growing up. Their friendship began in 2015 after the former One Direction member presented his idol with a hand-piped birthday cake after a Fleetwood Mac gig in London. (“Glad she liked carrot cake,” he later said.) The years since have seen the duo’s mutual affection blossom into one of pop culture’s most cherished bondings. 

Last year, when Styles inducted Nicks into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, he proclaimed the 72-year-old “everything you’ve ever wanted in a lady, a lover, in a friend.” Nicks has gushed about him in interviews as everything from “the son she never had” to her “love child” with bandmate Mick Fleetwood. Styles earned her official seal of approval after covering “The Chain” every night of his first solo tour in support of a record that sounds closer to Crosby, Stills & Nash than anything he released under his prior band. 

“Harry could’ve lost a lot of fans, but he didn’t,” Nicks recently told Vogue over the phone. “I’m so proud of him because he took a risk and didn’t go the One Direction route. He loves One Direction, I love One Direction, and a gazillion other people do too, but Harry didn’t wanna go the pop route. He wanted straight-up rock and roll circa 1975.”  

Nicks has been embracing some of the busiest years of her dual careers as both Fleetwood Mac frontwoman and solo sorceress—and doing so amid a global pandemic. Since she last performed with Styles at the Forum for his Fine Line release show in December, she’s released a 24 Karat Gold concert film and “Show Them the Way,” her politically minded single and first piece of original music in six years. After Miley Cyrus asked for Nicks’s blessing before releasing her “Edge of Seventeen”–tinged “Midnight Sky,” the two joined forces for an exhilarating new mash-up titled “Edge of Midnight.”

In honor of Styles making history as the magazine’s first solo cover boy, Nicks caught up with Vogue to answer all our questions about their cosmic connection. Currently beachside with her quarantine bubble in Hawaii, she’s been doing what one would expect Stevie Nicks to be up to during a pandemic: writing new music, dancing around her house to “Watermelon Sugar,” and “casting little spells.” As befitting rock’s foremost storyteller, our intended 30-minute chat turned into a two-hour confessional about her love of Styles, working with Cyrus for the first time, joining Fleetwood Mac, the president-elect Joe Biden, the Met Gala, betta fish funerals, and much more. 

Your assistant just texted me a photo of the most gorgeous sunset I’ve ever seen. Where are you calling from? 

We just got to Maui. It’s turning winter in Los Angeles, and I live close to the beach, where it’s colder than anywhere else in Southern California. Me and my quarantine buddies had a little break where we thought we could come over safely, so we did. 

Did you bring your dogs along?

Yes. We have three—two Chinese cresteds and one Yorkshire—and they’re thrilled. I think this pandemic affected them too because they’re travelers. It’s just a two-week trip, but we brought enough stuff to last us a year. I don’t really come out of my room much since I don’t go to bed until seven in the morning and typically sleep until three—and that’s whether I’m in L.A. or London. Wherever I go, I still end up having breakfast at five in the afternoon. 

Last time we spoke you talked about the inspiration behind writing “Show Them the Way” around the time of the 2008 election and waiting all these years release it until you felt the moment was right. How does it feel now to finally have it out in the world? 

Saturday, November 14, 2020

Q&A Anything Stevie Nicks says carries a massive amount of weight.

Q&A: Stevie Nicks On How Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne And CSN Shaped Her Sound

By Steve Baltin - Forbes

Anything Stevie Nicks says carries a massive amount of weight. She is a two-time member of the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, solo and with Fleetwood Mac, and one of the most beloved icons in music today.

So when she talks about her influences, those artists that shaped her sound, it is a fascinating read. And one of the main influences in the quartet that she says, " I just put in the big witches' pot and stirred it up and made it into one thing," to make her sound, happens to be fellow multiple member of the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame (solo and with Buffalo Springfield), Neil Young, who turns 75 today.

So in honor of Young's seventy-fifth birthday, here is part three of my incredible 90-minute conversation with Nicks, where she talks about her quartet of influences, Bob Dylan and much more. If you want to know where Stevie Nicks' sound comes from, she tells you here. And not surprisingly it is some of the greats of music, like Crosby, Stills And Nash, who she talks about wanting to cover. How cool would that be?

Steve Baltin: I love the way that you refer to "Show Them The Way" as a prayer and saving the world. What are some protest songs for you, that give you the feeling of being able to save the world and also what are some songs that are like a prayer for you, that have a similar sort of ethos to show them the way?

Stevie Nicks: That’s a hard question. When I think of actual protest songs, the song that runs through my head is Bob Dylan’s "Tangled Up in Blue," “There was music in the cafes and revolution in the air." I was just losing my head the first time I heard "Tangled Up in Blue." Which was a long time ago, before there was ever a political bone in my body .But I understood that he was very political and that just everything he wrote was touched with some politics. And the idea that there was music in the cafes and revolution in the air, and that’s what music does to people. They may be out there protesting in the streets, but if there wasn’t a pandemic they’d still be going into restaurants and into bars and into clubs and discuss it in those places and play music and they’d be discussing it while music was playing. So I think that it’s what Bob Dylan meant by that statement. I just always think of that.

Baltin: Blood On The Tracks is such a personal album that is intertwined with political. When you look at other songs that you’ve written, are there other songs of yours that you feel you were… touched by God, as if you were a conduit for it?

Nicks: Well I think I was definitely a conduit for this. I don’t know if I’ve ever written a political song actually. I did write a song, "Desert Angel,' for Desert Storm, and that was a long time ago. I was in Phoenix when that happened. I must have been pretty bummed out about it because I wrote that song. And I wrote "Illume" for 9/11and I’ve never been able to do "Illume" on stage, still, after all this time, because it’s too close. I don’t know if I could do it. And "Desert Angel," that I never did. Those are my three political songs, "Illume," "Desert Angel", and this one.

Baltin: Most writers agree songs change for them over time. Look at a song like "Landslide," written in 1975, it probably feels like an entirely different life?

Nicks: Yeah, they do change for sure. It’s interesting that you bring up Jackson [Browne’s] song "These Days" because the line in that that I remember is the one, “Don't confront me with my failures / I have not forgotten them.” That line, because we all feel that way. You don’t have to bring up my failures to me because I know exactly what they were. That’s a pretty heavy statement. It’s like "Music in the cafes and revolution in the air," sometimes just a sentence out of somebody’s song will mean a million things to you, who didn’t write it. Just to the person that’s listening to it. And sometimes us as writers are the last people to really understand.

Baltin: What have you been listening to during this time?

Nicks: I love Neil Young . I've been listening to a lot of Crosby, Stills, Nash And Young and Joni Mitchell and just that whole era of people. Buffalo Springfield in the last seven, eight months. I've been listening to a lot of their music on my Sonos and it makes me happy. And I've decided that Neil Young was actually a lot more...he wrote a lot of very loving love ballads. He was not only the huge rock and roll crazy guy that I always thought. There are so many ballads I've gone, "Wow, you know what? You're just a big pussycat. I can't believe it." No wonder they chose him to come into Crosby, Stills And Nash. They wanted somebody like the Eagles wanted Joe Walsh, they wanted somebody that would have that heavy hand. But then when you listen to something like "Slowpoke" or some of these amazing songs, I've been blown away over the last couple of months listening to his ballads going like, "This guy, really seriously, in a way, wanted to be in love."

Baltin: That is fascinating. But it's interesting because I noticed that transition musically from angry young men in Dylan and Petty to much more sentimental and forgiving. But I also think guys just mellow as they get older.

Nicks: Yeah, I do too. And I'm glad that most of them got their hard rock parts out and then also got some of the beautiful love things out at the same time so that it wasn't like they were tacking on the other side at the end of their career. So they were actually written around the same time because I've been listening to Crosby, Stills, Nash And Young and some of those songs, some of those records, are really sweet from Neil Young and I just never knew that.

Baltin: Is there one song off that record that speaks to you the most?

Nicks: Well, that whole record. I spent my whole summer after my senior year listening to nothing but that record for three solid months. Every single song from "Helplessly Hoping" to a bunch of songs I would really like to record and talk about protest songs, "For What It's Worth" and "Ohio," they wrote some really amazing protest songs. You're like, "Wow, those things could have been written today too."

Baltin: Great protest songs are timeless because the best protest writers are also the best storytellers often, Look at Jackson Browne, who is one of my favorite lyricists of all time.

Nicks: "That Girl Could Sing," one of my favorite songs because I always wanted to think that, even though I didn't know Jackson Browne at that point, that he wrote that about me because, "Oh, I'm such a cool presence." And when you take, "She was a friend to me when I needed one," and you remember those sentences and even the melody of those sentences. When I tell people my greatest influences I say Joni Mitchell for phrasing, she could fit 50 words in a sentence and have them sound glorious without being rushed or crushed in, so I really learned a lot from her about phrasing. From Jackson I learned about writing love songs. From Crosby, Stills And Nash it was the three-part harmony I wanted Lori [Nicks], Sharon [Celani] and me to become like to make my first solo album, which we are doing even on this record, even on this song. There's one line where we do a three-part, "It was just another night in the presence of Martin Luther King," we did that in a three-part. And every time it goes by I go, "That was it, that was what I told Jimmy Iovine when I told him I wanted to produce the record." I told him, "I have two girl singers and they sing amazing. And together we have created a sound. It's like a Crosby, Stills And Nash sound and that's what we want. I don't always want my voice to be louder than theirs." And he said, "Okay, that's what we'll do." That's another thing. I'm so proud of this song, I'm so proud of the singing in this song. It maybe a political song, it maybe a protest song, it may just be a really good song. But what it also is, it's a really well-sung song. And I'm so proud of the girls because we didn't have much time and we pulled off some of the best vocals we have ever done since 1980 when we started Bella Donna.

Baltin: How do you hear all of those influences in your music?

Nicks: When I was coming out of high school to my second year of junior college that was when those four influences really started to take over my life, to the point I'd get in an elevator with Lindsey [Buckingham] and I would be singing Joni Mitchell's "Same Situation:" and he'd look at me and go, "Don't you know anything else?" And I'd look at him and go, "No, I don't. That's all I know right now is that song. I'm just gonna continue to sing it, so thank you" (laughs). That was how completely attached I would get to each one of the songs on all those records. I would just pick one and stick with it for two weeks. That's how I learned. I put them all together, all those people, I blended them into one voice. I took what I thought was the greatest thing about the way Joni phrased and about how Jackson picked out incredibly romantic things to say and about how Crosby, Stills And Nash had the three-part harmony that made me think I should be on the Southern Cross sailboat that was going across the ocean singing at the top of your lungs and that Neil Young was actually a sweet, loving guy that just wanted to be in love besides being a rock star. And all of that I just put in the big witches' pot and stirred it up and made it into one thing. And that was my inspiration for everything I ever did.

Q&A with Stevie Nicks "One Last Thing" People Magazine November 23, 2020

 From the November 23, 2020 issue of People Magazine with Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on the cover.



STEVIE NICKS, THE SINGER- SONGWRITER, 72, JUST RELEASED HER 24 KARAT GOLD TOUR LIVE ALBUM AND HER NEW SINGLE ‘SHOW THEM THE WAY’


Last time I was starstruck


David Beckham. It was at a big concert in San Francisco, and he just oozed handsomeness. Gorgeousness, you know? I just stood there, like, “Is this real? Maybe it’s a dream.”

Last time I danced

I dance around my apartment all the time. I like to make up dances to Lady Gaga’s song “Applause.” my girlfriends and I have our own version of the Hustle that we update.

Last time I missed someone

My niece just got married, and I couldn’t go to her wedding. I can’t run over and hug my friends. My mantra every day is: I’m not getting [the coronavirus]; I can’t chance it.

Last indulgence

I found out I’m allergic to gluten. But I just had these gluten-free brownies from Erewhon Market in Pacific Palisades that taste like chocolate soufflé. As long as they exist, I can do this.

Last time my dog made me laugh

Lily, my Chinese crested, just the way she walks: Her little butt does the total Marilyn Monroe wiggle. It’s back and forth, back and forth. I say to her, “We will get old, but this will never get old.”

By JULIE JORDAN



Friday, November 13, 2020

NEW Remix of Midnight Sky "Edge of Midnight" with Stevie Nicks


Miley Cyrus and Stevie Nicks Team Up for ‘Edge of Seventeen’/’Midnight Sky’ Mashup

By Chris Willman - Variety

Because it’s not enough for just one vintage Stevie Nicks song to have reentered the zeitgeist (see: the TikTok “Dreams” resurgence), Miley Cyrus is doing her best to make sure that history quickly repeats itself by pushing another Nicks favorite, “Edge of Seventeen,” back into public prominence.

Late Thursday night, Miley released what is officially deemed “Edge of Midnight (Midnight Sky Remix),” a track that mashes up her own current single, “Midnight Sky,” a top 20 hit released in August, with “Edge of Seventeen,” the hit that appeared on Nicks’ first solo album, “Bella Donna,” back in 1981.

Although no details were immediately released about the track apart from the two singers’ respective tweets, it does appear that Nicks participated in the remix to the extent of lending her voice to Cyrus’ new song, too, as it appears in the conjoined mix, which starts off with Waddy Wachtel’s unmistakable 16th-note guitar riff.

“Stevie Nicks has always been my idol & an inspiration. It’s an honor to now call her my friend and collaborator,” Cyrus wrote on Instagram. Among the immediate responses were triply repeated fire emoji from fan Kacey Musgraves. Nicks herself posted: “Miley…Magical! Loved singing with her!”

Cyrus had previously acknowledged getting Nicks’ approval to sample “Seventeen” for the original track, in which the interpolation is far more subtle. The singer said on Jimmy Fallon’s show that she contacted Nicks and “said, ‘I have an alternate melody if you don’t want to kind of like pay tribute to you and your greatness and how much you’ve inspired me.’ And she said, ‘You can borrow from me anytime.'”

The idea of a more overt mashup of the two songs had already achieved some popularity before this official release. YouTube user Kelly Green, who goes under the name “kelexandra,” combined the two songs in a series of videos that have accumulated more than a million views since the first of them was uploaded August 15.

Cyrus’ official mashup is not the first time a major pop star has felt compelled to adopt Nicks’ classic as part of a new song. Destiny’s Child sampled Wachtel’s guitar part on “Edge of Seventeen” for the trio’s “Bootylicious” smash in 2001, and although Nicks didn’t appear on the track itself, she did put in a cameo in the video.

Nicks has openly admitted doing some nicking herself, when she based another early solo hit, “Stand Back,” on something she picked out of Prince’s “Little Red Corvette,” although few probably would have noticed any similarity if she didn’t point it out. In her new concert film, “24 Karat Gold,” Nicks tells the story of calling up Prince to tell him she was borrowing an element from his hit and inviting him to the studio to get his seal of approval.

Cyrus’ new album, “Plastic Hearts,” is due Nov. 27.





Monday, November 02, 2020

REVIEW: STEVIE NICKS REMAINS AT THE TOP OF HER GAME


Stevie Nicks – Live in Concert: The 24 Karat Gold Tour

Rating ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

RetroPop

In 2019, Stevie Nicks became the first woman to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame twice – for her work with Fleetwood Mac and her illustrious solo career which, since 1981, has spawned 8 hit LPs and classic hits like Edge of Seventeen, Stand Back, Talk to Me, Rooms on Fire and Leather and Lace. 

Her latest project, the movie 24 Karat Gold: The Concert, comes amid the pandemic that’s seen touring events cancelled and live music venues shuttered – with the star taking her 2016/2017 solo tour to the big screen as a means of escapism for fans. 

Accompanying the release is Live in Concert: The 24 Karat Gold Tour – collecting Stevie’s live set on 2CD and 2LP formats for the first time. 

Fans of the star, who recently released her first single in six years, Show Them the Way, will know the frustrations of her solo sets which, for a number of years, rarely differed and featured the same handful of classic solo and Fleetwood Mac hits. This time around, though, things are different… 

The 24 Karat Gold Tour came following two back-to-back tours with the band – 2013’s Fleetwood Mac Live jaunt and the 2014/2015 On With The Show Tour, which saw the return of Christine McVie – in between which Stevie recorded and released her eighth solo album, 24 Karat Gold: Songs from the Vault.

The record sees the singer-songwriter revisit outtakes from her previous LPs, which she took to Nashville with Eurythmics star Dave Stewart and re-recorded over a three-week period. 

It resulted in a 16-track collection and, after dipping into her “gothic trunk of lost songs,” the star hit the road to unearth more lost gems on stage – with a setlist featuring all the hits along with album cuts and rarities that’d never been performed on the concert stage. 

Look no further than opening track Gold and Braid – originally recorded for and omitted from Stevie’s debut LP Bella Donna – which, to this day, has not been issued on a studio album. It sets the tone for a set packed with golden moments which, even for the most casual fans, is a breath of fresh air. 

Three 24 Karat Gold tracks are included – Belle Fleur, Starshine and If You Were My Love – along with rare album cuts Bella Donna, Wild Heart and New Orleans, and Crying in the Night – the should-have-been lead single from her 1973 pre-Fleetwood Mac album with Lindsey Buckingham. 

Of course, the hits are in there, with Gold Dust Woman and Edge of Seventeen both clocking in around the 10 minute mark. Rhiannon, Gypsy and Landslide also feature from her Mac catalogue, alongside solo hits like If Anyone Falls and Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.

The pièce de résistance: a stunning, mid-set, eight-minute rendition of 2010’s Moonlight (A Vampire’s Dream), which has been reimagined as a sweeping piano ballad, building to a crescendo that incorporates the rock-tinged album version and elevates the track to another stratosphere. 

When it comes to live albums – whoever the act – we’ve come to expect the usual mix of hits plus a 3 or 4 “deep cuts,” so for a star like Stevie Nicks to let loose and throw as many curveballs as she does in this show is a testament to an artist who, after five decades in music, remains at the top of her game. 

Brava, Stevie…

Stevie Nicks – Live in Concert: The 24 Karat Gold Tour is available on download or stream now. The 2LP version will be released in December. 


REVIEW Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold the Concert


‘Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold the Concert’ is too long, but worth a cozy sit-down

BY SKYLAR DE PAUL
The Daily Californian
Grade: 3.5/5.0
November 2, 2020

Stevie Nicks is inarguably one of the most celebrated figures in rock history. She’s a championed songwriter, a two-time inductee at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and now, thanks to the powers of director and producer Joe Thomas and Nicks herself, she could be “performing” from the comforts of your own living room. 

In a new concert movie, filmed over two nights in Pittsburgh and Indianapolis during her 2017 tour, “Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold the Concert” premiered at drive-ins, select theaters and other spaces for two nights last month. The film is a breath of fresh air for those craving a live listen, but boy, does this movie deliver much more than songs — it’s equal parts wonderful and absolutely tiring. 

In the opening scene, Nicks enters the stage with the same graceful bow she’s performed for decades on end, wearing her signature all-black gown, boots and fingerless gloves — truly no one can pull off the part-time witch look like the “Rhiannon” songstress herself. The scarves tied around her microphone stand and tambourine speak to her timeless aesthetic, viewers finding familiar comfort in her shiny, gold crescent moon necklace.

With a performance of “Gold and Braid,” a late ’70s groove sets the tone for a night of mystic tunes. For the movie’s set list, cutting the two performance nights together, Nicks says she went through her “dark gothic trunk of lost songs” to curate the performance, playing everything she never had the chance to or that she never released on a record.

“This show is different,” she says. “It’s not the same Stevie Nicks show you’ve seen a million times, because I am not the same Stevie Nicks that you’ve seen a million times.”

It’s clear by her stage presence that Nicks hasn’t forgotten how to work a crowd, even if this was filmed a few years back. “If Anyone Falls” shows excellent supporting harmonies by backup singers, the band working in a synergy that only musicians of a certain stature and experience can ever truly reach. Synth keyboards add depth to the live sound of the concert, supporting Nicks’ ever-controlled vocal delivery.

The only glaring downside of this film is its exhaustive run time. Clocking in at over two hours of songs and prolonged monologues, Nicks spends much of the time ruminating on the various situations that inspired her career and certain songs. It reaches the point where some viewers probably can’t help but wonder if even the live audience was starting to get tired of her rambling, but nevertheless, Nicks is still shown to be a gentle entertainer by nature.

Tuesday, October 27, 2020

BOX OFFICE STATS: Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold The Concert Film

‘Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold’ Doc Heads To PVOD As Distributor Trafalgar Releasing Adapts To Pandemic Era

By Tom Grater - Deadline
October 26, 2020

Following its global cinema release last week, event music doc Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold The Concert is heading to premium VOD as distributor Trafalgar Releasing looks to employ new release strategies in the pandemic era.

The film will be available to rent online from October 29 at 9am PT at a premium $19.99 price point until November 5 at 11.59 PT via the official website. Audiences will have 48 hours to watch after purchase. The move follows similar PVOD endeavors undertaken by studios during the pandemic such as Universal with Trolls World Tour.

This marks the first such VOD release for event cinema specialist Trafalgar, which has to date relied heavily on theatrical in its business model. The company reduced its output while cinemas were disrupted by the pandemic and is now looking to take its ‘event’ style of releasing into the digital sphere, partnering with Nicks and her management company BMG on the release. Trafalgar’s primary focus still remains cinemas, Kymberli Frueh, Trafalgar’s SVP Programming & Content Acquisitions, emphasized to Deadline.

“The central reason from Stevie Nicks and the team at BMG for providing a video-on-demand alternative for the 24 Karat Gold concert film was to create options for consumers, ensuring fans feel safe wherever they watch the film and to hedge against uncertainty around market closures and COVID spikes,” Frueh explained.

“Whether it’s outdoor drive in locations, safely opened cinemas or online options, cinemas remain our main focus as they offer a safe communal experience among fans—especially since concerts and touring have stopped for now. Event cinema brings fans together in their local movie theater to enjoy their favorite artists as a community, as if they were at a live concert.

“While the team liked the opportunity from the onset, it became increasingly important when some cinema chains closed all locations due to lack of new film releases. As COVID concerns continue to keep NY and LA closed, outdoor and online became even more critical as viewing options as these are core markets for fans,” she said.

The film entered cinemas around the world on October 21 and reached number one in the UK and number two in the U.S.; it played in around 900 cinemas worldwide.

Directed and produced by Joe Thomas during Nick’s 67-city sold out 24 Karat Gold Tour, the film explores the inspirations behind some of the musician’s most know songs from her times as a member of Fleetwood Mac and as a solo artist.

BOX OFFICE STATS






Monday, October 26, 2020

STEVIE NICKS PLANS SOLO TOUR WHEN THE WORLD GETS BACK TO NORMAL


Stevie Nicks on Her New Concert Film, the ‘Crazy’ Resurgence of ‘Dreams’ and Staying in Touch With the Spirits of Prince and Tom Petty

In a wide-ranging Q&A, the singer discusses everything from a life-changing moment seeing the "Woodstock" movie at a drive-in to having her own new "24 Karat Gold: The Concert" film play at outdoor and indoor theaters.

By Chris Willman - Variety

Not that it ever was far from rock fans’ consciousness, but Stevie Nicks’ voice is suddenly a ubiquitous part of popular culture again, thanks to a viral video of a skateboarding man singing along to Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams” that has become the feel-good hit of a feel-bad fall season. Naturally, the snippet of it has made a hungry world ready again to consume more of “Dreams” than can fit in a TikTok video, which is why “Dreams” and the “Rumours” album have both returned to the top 10, 43 years later.

But if the resurgence has led you to want to hear not just “Dreams” but two hours and 10 minutes of unexpurgated Stevie, the universe has conspired to accommodate that. Sunday night, Nicks’ film, “24 Karat Gold: The Movie,” will be playing at theaters and drive-ins across the country. It’ll be followed Friday by the release of a full soundtrack on CD (as a Target exclusive), on vinyl (at Barnes & Noble) and for download, further capturing a 2017 show in Pittsburgh that found Nicks at what she considers her well-oiled performing peak. Its rendering of something that seems impossible now — an arena gig — really does feel like a dream.

Nicks got on the phone with Variety earlier this month, just as the “Dreams” phenomenon was starting to take off, to discuss the making of the new concert movie, a new studio single (“Show Them the Way”), her Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction last year, feeling like she’s still in touch with Tom Petty and Prince, how the “Woodstock” film changed her life, hopes and fears about the coronavirus crisis, and the importance of suede boots on the ground.

VARIETY: One of the songs in this concert film is “Dreams.” As you know, there’s this whole TikTok video tie-in, and suddenly “Dreams” is on the chart again.

NICKS: From the skateboarder? I know. How crazy is that? My assistant showed it to me — he’s drinking his juice and just skateboarding along and just filming himself and singing “Dreams.” It’s so funny, and so great, because “Dreams” is a fun song to sing. I’m thrilled that people still love it, and that it does still make people happy. And who knows even why? But it does. But “Dreams” came out how many years ago? Like in 1975, right? [Editor’s note: early 1977.] My assistant just told me there’s a lot of young kids who don’t even know the song, but they like it, and its streaming is massive. It’s fantastic.

STEVIE NICKS 24 KARAT GOLD CONCERT ON DEMAND AVAILABLE OCT 29th


For the first time ever, get a virtual front-row seat to the magic that Stevie Nicks brings to the stage - from the comfort and the safety of your home! Recorded over two nights during her sold-out 24 Karat Gold Tour, this feature-length concert film features a set-list of fan favorites and rare gems from Stevie’s multi-platinum selling catalog. The film also highlights Stevie’s intuitive and intimate storytelling abilities, captivating audiences with personal stories behind some of the most famous songs in music history.

PRE-ORDER TODAY

Premium video streaming access for Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold The Concert will begin October 29 at 9:00am PST / 12:00pm EST, with purchase available through November 5, 2020 at 11:59 PM PST. The event will be available for replay for 48 hours following purchase and is not available for download.

Please note your 48-hour viewing period will begin as soon as it is made available on October 29.




STEVIE NICKS 'because of “Show Them the Way” I will make another record'


Stevie Nicks on Why Payback Is Coming For Trump Post-Coronavirus and Plans for New Album

"I never thought that I would’ve gone underground so heavily as I have," says Nicks of struggling to find inspiration amidst the pandemic.


By Lyndsey Havens - Billboard
10/26/2020

When Stevie Nicks was my age, she tells me, she had just joined Fleetwood Mac at 27.

“I remember the phone call,” she says, calling from her Los Angeles home’s landline late on Saturday night. “I remember scheduling a dinner the next day and meeting for Mexican food somewhere in Hollywood where it was all decided. It’s just like yesterday to me; I can smell the amazing smells of enchiladas and tacos and tamales, and see all of their beautiful faces. We were so young, but it just seems like I could reach out and touch that night.”

Now, Nicks is 72 -- and enjoying the unexpected return of Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams” and Rumours back on the charts at No. 12 on the Hot 100 and No. 7 on the Billboard 200, respectively. Meanwhile, Nicks herself just topped the Billboard Songwriter’s Chart.

It’s all thanks to the now famous TikTok; yes, that one with user doggface208 longboarding and sipping some Ocean Spray while vibing out to “Dreams.” Since he posted it to the platform, the clip has raked in 65.5 million views, and inspired everyone from Mick Fleetwood, Shakira and even Nicks herself to join in with their own renditions.

She says she’s “tickled pink” at the virality of her decades-old hit, and shares one important piece of advice: “If the young kids start listening to Fleetwood Mac, start with the first album and just go through them. Sit down and be in it for the long run, and you’ll have the best time.”

She also relates the moment currently being experienced by doggface208 (real name: Nathan Apodaca) to her own unexpected early-'70s breakthrough with Fleetwood Mac. “We all do silly, creative dumb things that we never think anybody is going to care about, and the fact that [this TikTok user] just reached out to the entire world with his 10-second ride… his life will never be the same. In a strange way, it’s kind of like when Lindsey and I joined [the band] and we had no money -- and I do mean no money -- and within eight months, together we were almost a millionaire.”

Now, Nicks is a millionaire many times over on her own accord, and has celebrated one victory after the next throughout her career, whether historic accomplishments like becoming the first (and still only) woman to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame twice, or personal triumphs like participating in her first Zoom during the ongoing pandemic (she says the concept is “terrifying”).

And even though the icon has made her hatred of our current reality well known -- she refuses to contract the coronavirus, saying “I have put a clear plastic ring of angels around my body” -- she’s still managed to find pockets of creativity this year, resulting in her anticipated concert film, Live In Concert: The 24 Karat Gold Tour, which hit select theaters and drive-ins for two nights only last weekend, and powerful new pop-rock single, “Show Them The Way,” her first piece of new music in six years.

With so much to celebrate, it’s odd for Nicks to be lounging at home. “One more reason to hate this pandemic is that if this hadn’t been going on, I would have been out in the world [right now],” she says. “The only connection that I really have to all of this is doing these interviews.”

How does it feel to be back in the spotlight while also stuck at home?


Sunday, October 25, 2020

Singer, songwriter, superstar Stevie Nicks is getting a little restless these days.


Rock star Stevie Nicks, in her own words

CBS Sunday Morning Interview with Tracy Smith

Singer, songwriter, superstar Stevie Nicks is getting a little restless these days.

The pandemic has put performances for large audiences on hold so she's waiting to take the stage again, and, as she told "CBS Sunday Morning's" Tracy Smith last week, the waiting is the hardest part.

"It seems like, for so many creative people, this is a very creative time. But, also, time is slipping away," Smith said to Nicks.

"Time is being stolen from all of us," Nicks said. "Absolutely. Especially if you're 72 years old."

"Does that weigh on you?" Smith asked.


"Yeah, it does," Nicks said. "When you're really working, you really stay young. You stay young because you have to."  "But, when you're just sitting around in your house, I think that Old Man Time starts to get ahold of you," the Fleetwood Mac singer continued.

Still, it seems that Old Man Time has always been kind to Stevie Nicks. You can see it in her just-released feature film, "24 Karat Gold the Concert," where she looks and sounds pretty much the same as she always did.  The movie will stream soon, but for the moment it's being shown in socially distanced theaters.

"It's as close to a really big rock 'n roll concert in a big venue as you're gonna get," Nicks said.

And it's not the only way Stevie is making herself heard these days. She decided to release her first new song in six years, "Show them the Way," as a call for action on the eve of the election.

And now, some of her classic tunes are suddenly climbing the charts again. Thanks to a cranberry-juice-loving Idaho skateboarder who went viral after posting a video on TikTok featuring Fleetwood Mac's "Dreams."

"So four decades after 'Dreams' and 'Rumours' came out, they're both in the top 10 again," Smith said.

"I know," Nicks said.

The video has inspired quite a few imitators, including bandmate Mick Fleetwood. And last week, one from Nicks herself.

"This TikTok thing has, kind of, blown my mind," Nicks said. "And I'm happy about it because it seems to have made so many people happy."

You could say making people happy has been Stevie Nicks' calling for the past 50 years or so,  And after a career of platinum-selling albums and sold-out concerts, she became the first and, so far, only woman to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice.

"It's 22 men that are in twice for their solo work and being in a big band," Nicks said. "And no women."

"Until you," Smith said.

"Until me," Nicks said. "So I feel that I definitely broke a big rock 'n roll glass ceiling."

And her backstory is just as legendary.

When young Stevie dropped out of college to chase her musical dreams, her parents cut her off financially. So she waited tables and cleaned houses to support herself and her then-boyfriend, guitarist Lindsey Buckingham.

"Were there moments when you were cleaning, I mean, you were like cleaning houses, what, scrubbing toilets, mopping floors. Was there a moment when you thought, 'Ooh, I made a mistake?'" Smith asked.

"No. No, because I was doing that to support my music, my music pal, Lindsey and some other friends, too, you know, that didn't have hardly anything," Nicks said. "So I was the one who actually was able to pay the rent and pay the money to keep our Toyota running. And so it's like, I didn't mind at all, because I did not expect my boyfriend, Lindsey, to get a job. Because what in the world would he do?"

"So you had to be the one?" Smith said.

"It was all about me," Nicks said.

By the time she became a member of Fleetwood Mac, she almost expected to be underestimated. So she had an arrangement with the group's other female star, Christine McVie.

"You two stuck together through thick and thin and really had each other's backs," Smith said.

"Yeah, we did," Nicks said. "And Christine and I, we made a pact at the very beginning that if we were ever in a room of super famous guitar players that didn't treat us with the respect that we thought that we deserved, that we would just stand up and say, 'This party's over,' and we would walk out."

"And did you have to do that?" Smith asked.

"We never actually did have to do that," Nicks said. "So that was a nice surprise. We never had to make a scene."

And their friendship endures.

Stevie Nicks' romantic relationships seemed to be more of a challenge, but they inspired some great music.

"Have you had a love," Smith asked, "a great love in your life?"

"Yeah. Three. But it's not easy to be Mr. Stevie Nicks," Nicks said. "Even if you happen to be Mr. Really Famous Rock Star Guy."

"So Lindsey falls in that category?" Smith asked. "The great loves?"

"Oh, absolutely. Well, not exactly," Nicks said. "Lindsey is — has his own category. Lindsey was my great musical love. That's different."

Stevie Nicks' dad once told her she'd never marry because her music would always come first. He was wrong, she was briefly married once. But dad was also right.

For Stevie Nicks, music will always be her true love.

"When I'm 90 years old," Nicks said, "I don't wanna be laying in my big, gorgeous bedroom and, you know, with music playing and 15 little Chinese crested dogs and going like, 'Ugh, I'm so broken-hearted that I didn't find the one.'"

"And then I would have to answer myself and say, 'Yes, but you did find several "the ones" who you wrote really great songs about and that's why you're living in this absolutely spectacular house with everything that you want and anything that you could possibly wanna buy,'" Nicks continued. "And it's, like, so maybe this is just all the way your dad saw it when he said, 'Stevie will never get married.'"

"And the way it's supposed to be," Smith said.




Saturday, October 24, 2020

Returning to her 2017 live shows proved to be a godsend for Stevie Nicks


Stevie Nicks Can’t Wait for the Magic to Come Back

Nicks discusses her ’24 Karat Gold Concert Film’ and returning to live shows in new interview


By Brittany Spanos - Rollingstone
Photo: Randee St Nicholas

In another life, Stevie Nicks would have been a music-film editor. “I think I’m really good at it,” she says one Friday evening, calling from her home in Los Angeles. Her canine companion Lily is begging for her attention with a toy as Nicks reflects on her second life. “I can only say this about a few things.”

She’s had plenty of experience, working closely with director Joe Thomas on concert films for Fleetwood Mac (2004’s Live in Boston), her late friend Tom Petty (2006’s Live From Gainesville), and most recently, Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold Concert Film. Recorded during her 2017 tour stops in Indianapolis and Pittsburgh, the film is getting a special release this month and being screened at select drive-ins, theaters, and exhibition spaces on October 21st through 25th. The set lists featured classic solo and Nicks-led Fleetwood Mac songs along with tracks off her 2014 album, 24 Karat Gold: Songs From the Vault. For the music fans desperately missing live shows in the time of Covid-19, the film perfectly encapsulates the tambourine-banging, shawl-twirling, story-spinning magic that only Nicks can deliver.

Putting the project together with Thomas became one of two pandemic projects for the rock goddess (the other being her new song “Show Them the Way”). She flew out to Chicago in May with her assistant on a “full-on, fogged-out, Covid-free private plane” and lived in a house on a golf course that no one had been in since before lockdown had begun. Nicks would go to Thomas’ studio, masked up alongside everyone else (“I felt imprisoned by the mask, but I love the mask — I felt safe”), and got to work, diligently assessing the footage captured by all 12 cameras from shows in the two cities.

“I’m really the second editor,” she says of her uncredited job. “The fact is that if I don’t like a shot, it’s not going in.” She learned, as she had in past editing-room experiences, that men see women differently.



Even in quarantine Stevie Nicks is not slowing down!


Stevie Nicks is still dreaming

by - Greg Wetherall - Dazed
October 20, 2020
Photo: Randee St Nicholas

She’s just released her first solo single in six years. A new concert film is about to hit cinemas. And a viral TikTok has put the Fleetwood Mac classic Rumours back in the Top 10. Even in quarantine, the rock and roll icon is not slowing down.

Stevie Nicks has had “a hell of a day”. Not only is it 3am at her home in Los Angeles when we first speak on the phone, the power has gone out in her house. “It was out all day until about nine o’clock (in the evening), but we’ve not been here,” she laments. “We got home and it was on. I came in, got ready to do this interview, and the power went out again.”

Nicks, the 72-year-old Fleetwood Mac singer and solo star, is almost entirely nocturnal these days. The coronavirus pandemic and subsequent quarantine has locked her into a diet of rolling news and perpetual worry, and being awake and active during the witching hour has become her normal. Her current lack of electricity, however, is somewhat less so. “We are prepared here, just in case there’s an earthquake,” she continues (the ‘we’ referring to her assistant and two goddaughters, who Nicks has been holed up with ever since the pandemic struck). “We have a lot of lanterns. I’m in a window seat in a swing. We’ve lit the area so at least I can see the papers in front of me.” Our conversation unfurls to breaking news that Donald Trump has tested positive for COVID-19. “When everyone wakes up in the morning and discovers that the whole government has possibly been exposed to the virus, they’re gonna go crazy,” she remarks, adding that Trump contracting the virus proves that wearing a mask is “not political... it’s contagious and it’s dangerous”.

To speak with Stevie Nicks is to spend time with one of music’s true greats. Not only is she responsible for writing some of the rock and pop canon’s greatest standards – “Dreams”, “Landslide”, “Edge of Seventeen” – her life has been so eventful that it can include opening up for Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix, to turning down Prince’s offer to record “Purple Rain” among its many, many tales. When we talk, she’s just arrived home from the edit suite, where she’s been busy applying the finishing touches to the video for “Show Them the Way”, her first solo single in six years.


Stevie Nicks can’t wait to perform with Harry Styles again when this is all through

Stevie Nicks Just Wants to Keep Telling Stories

by Keaton Bell - Vogue
October 20, 2020
Photo: Randee St Nicholas

Stevie Nicks bought her first copy of Vogue when she was 25 years old. It was 1973, around the time of Buckingham Nicks, the first and only album she and ex-boyfriend Lindsey Buckingham ever released as a duo. Still a few years removed from the fame and fortune that would follow their recruitment into Fleetwood Mac, Nicks was earning just a buck fifty an hour waiting tables in a flapper girl uniform.

“I only had enough money for one magazine at that point, and Vogue was the first one I ever bought,” Nicks recalls. “I would scrape my money together and buy it every month.” 

Five decades later, Nicks—who prefers using a landline and doesn’t own a computer—still finds comfort in her lo-fi rituals. “To this day my favorite thing is getting into bed at five o’clock in the morning with a cup of decaf coffee, playing some soft, groovy music, and reading my Vogue,” she tells me. “Me and my little dog Lily pore over every single page for hours, and it’s been that way since 1973.”

Nicks has spent most of the pandemic in her Pacific Palisades home with two close friends and the aforementioned Lily—a Chinese crested who sits dutifully on her owner’s lap during our call. “She has her back turned to me because she doesn’t really wanna be here. I just know she’s plotting her escape,” Nicks says with a raspy giggle. “It’s fine. My feelings aren’t too hurt…well, they are, but I’ll be okay.”

As Fleetwood Mac’s lovelorn frontwoman, Nicks crafted masterworks out of the sex-and-drug-fueled dalliances that almost destroyed the group (documented in real time on their 1977 breakup opus Rumours). Still one of the 10 best-selling albums of all time, Rumours made stars out of its new lineup, but it was always clear from the outset who the breakout was. With three songwriters fighting for space on each record, it wasn’t long before Nicks needed her own outlet.

“They said, ‘You can make your solo album and have a solo trip, but if we go into work, we’re gonna call you,’” she remembers. “‘Terrific, I’ll be there.’ That was always my promise to them.” 1981’s shimmery Bella Donna set the stage for a second career that made Nicks the first woman to ever be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice (once with the group in 1998 and by herself just last year).

2020 was originally meant to be a year off from the grueling lifestyle that comes with back-to-back arena tours as both Fleetwood Mac frontwoman and solo enchantress. With just one festival show a month, Nicks would slow down. Then the shows—her headlining slots at Jazz Fest and Governors Ball were early casualties—began to be canceled.