Sunday, September 25, 2016

Stevie Nicks to perform Oct 3rd on Ellen and Oct 7th on The Late Late Show with James Corden

Look for Stevie in early October on The Late Late Show with James Corden October 7th (Late night October 6th) and also on daytime TV with Ellen October 3rd.



Friday, September 23, 2016

Lindsey Buckingham On Writing With Christine McVie on 'Mirage'

Arriving in store today (September 23) are deluxe editions of Fleetwood Mac's 1982 album Mirage.

The new set comes as a single-disc remastered version of the album along with a two-disc Expanded edition and a Deluxe package that includes three CDs, a DVD and an LP. The latter two include bonus demos, rarities and alternative tracks, while the Deluxe also features a 1982 concert from Los Angeles.

Mirage was the more "traditional" follow-up to 1979's experimental Tusk and hit No. 1 on the Billboard 200, going on to be certified double platinum. Lindsey Buckingham tells us that it was also on album on which he and singer-keyboardist Christine McVie -- who wrote the first single "Hold Me" -- clicked in a way that was different from the way he worked with Stevie Nicks:

"I would say that it's...an intangible thing. It's a very strong thing of what I always thought was, for lack of a better term, the whole being greater than the sum of the parts...and I think in that sense Christine and I as two musicians who are very well-grounded in their craft have a kind of symmetry of respect and love for each other on a creative and a musical and a personal level, and I think that was a big part of what that whole being greater than the sum of the parts was at the time. The fact that what I could do for her, I did it for Stevie too but the fact that she (McVie) could infuse her sensibilities into my stuff and I could tap into what I do as a producer, say, and give back so much to her."

McVie rejoined the band in 2014 following a nearly 16-year leave of absence. Fleetwood Mac has been working on new material but no release plans have been announced.

 - Gary Graff

Mick Fleetwood on if he's listened to the expanded version of Mirage

Released today (September 23rd) is the deluxe and expanded version of Fleetwood Mac‘s 1982 chart-topping Mirage collection. The album, which was released on June 18th, 1982, was the group’s first studio set of the decade and topped the album charts for five straight weeks. Mirage, which was released in the wake of Stevie Nicks‘ 1981 solo breakthrough, Bella Donna, was pushed by constant airplay of its first two singles and videos — Christine McVie‘s “Hold Me” and Nicks’ “Gypsy.” A third song from the set, McVie’s opening track “Love In Store” stalled at Number 22. In Britain, Lindsey Buckingham‘s neo-rockabilly track, “Oh Diane” was released as a single and scored the band its only Top 10 hit off the album there, when it peaked at Number Nine.

The newly expanded version of Mirage, features the remastered original 1982 album, a second disc of 19 alternate versions and outtakes, along with a third disc featuring highlights from the band’s brief U.S. tour in support of the album.

We caught up with Mick Fleetwood and asked him if he’s actually gone through the entire deluxe reissue of Mirage: 

“Oh yeah, we’ve all heard it — a while ago, to be quite blunt. So, we’re very happy with the way Warners. . . they do a lot of leg work. Y’know, we don’t actually have anywhere near — sadly — we don’t have anywhere near the archive (the) Beatles, and (Rolling) Stones, and Eagles and. . . I’m always happy when we do find something with outtakes and stuff like that that have been kept, and also it’s that time to do that. We’ve never really got into it. The Stones and the Beatles, they’ve been doing this for a long time.”

Fleetwood Mac’s Mirage has been re-released in three different configurations:

Deluxe: Three CDs, DVD and LP. Original album remastered, plus B-sides and rarities; the original album on LP; live performances; and a 5.1 mix on DVD
Expanded: Two CDs. Original album remastered, plus a disc of B-sides and rarities
Remastered: Original album remastered. A digital version is also be available.












LISTEN New Interview with Christine McVie on BBC Radio 2


Steve Wright in the Afternoon
BBC Radio 2

Steve and the team are joined by Christine McVie to talk about the deluxe reissue of the classic Fleetwood Mac album Mirage that was originally released in 1982.

BBC Radio2

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

REVIEW Fleetwood Mac Mirage (Expanded Reissue)

Fleetwood Mac - Mirage (Expanded Reissue)
(Warner Brothers/Rhino)
Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
American Songwriter
Written By Hal Horowitz


Often considered the belated follow-up to 1977’s mega platinum Rumours, 1982’s Mirage was a clear retreat from the somewhat abrasive, occasionally commercial avant-pop of the controversial Tusk. While that album has, over the decades, come to be respected as Lindsey Buckingham’s creative zenith, it appears Warner Brothers was less enthusiastic about their star act’s detour into the artsy abyss. Perhaps Mac were tired of it themselves, because the slick, glossily produced Mirage seems a capitulation to an audience who might have found the dense, inconsistent, but bold Tusk a musical and drug-fueled bridge too far.

While Mirage was no Rumours, its dozen sophisticated pop songs include such near-classics as “Love in Store,” “Gypsy,” and “Hold Me,” the latter two appearing on most subsequent Mac hits packages. But there are other, often unappreciated gems here too. Selections such as Buckingham’s folksy “Can’t Go Back,” Stevie Nicks’ surprisingly effective foray into country “That’s Alright,” the frisky pop/rock and sumptuous harmonies of “The Eyes of the World” and the closing “Wish You Were Here,” one of the always dependable Christine McVie’s more affecting and least appreciated pieces, are well worth reexamining.

It’s not a great album but it’s a good one, especially for Mac’s avid pop fans, and ripe for rediscovery on this newly remastered and expanded edition. A second disc with 20 previously unreleased rarities includes early, stripped down demos, alternate arrangements and outtakes of nearly every tune, plus some that didn’t make the final cut, and is well worth the price of admission. The no-frills versions are a welcome contrast to the finished product’s often over-produced slickness, and such oddities as a four minute in-studio jam on drummer Sandy Nelson’s 1959 instrumental “Teen Beat” with Buckingham at his most frazzled and unhinged is a major find.

But the real excitement is relegated to the pricey “deluxe” package that includes not only a 5.1 surround audio-only DVD of the album and a remastered vinyl reproduction, but a live show from the ‘82 Mirage tour. This 74-minute concert catches the band on a particularly inspired and improvisation filled night in LA as Mirage was ensconced atop the Billboard charts. It kicks off with a propulsive seven-minute “The Chain” that smokes the studio take into oblivion and features extended performances of two Tusk tracks with a nearly 10-minute “Not That Funny” along with another 8 minutes of “Sisters of the Moon,” closing with an unplugged emotional “Songbird” all in front of a clearly engaged audience.

Whether that’s worth dropping nearly $90 is up to you, but this is an invigorating presentation. It captures these five musicians (before they added an unnecessary backline to bolster the live sound) bouncing energy off each other and feeding from the crowd with exhilarating results.

MORE REVIEWS:
Fleetwood Mac – Mirage
The weakest album produced by the Rumours line-up? Or an essential chapter in the Fleetwood Mac story...
Sam Richards
Uncut


The deluxe edition of Mirage is out on September 23rd on Warner Brothers
Mirage (Deluxe) (3CD/1LP/1DVD-Audio)
http://smarturl.it/MirageDeluxe

Mick Fleetwood on Fleetwood Mac's 'Overlooked' Smash 'Mirage'

Ahead of new reissue, drummer talks "wild and romantic" France sessions, opulent video shoots and more
By Richard Bienstock
Rollingstone


"I don't think it would be wrong to say it sort of got overlooked," says Fleetwood Mac drummer Mick Fleetwood, reminiscing about his band's 1982 album, Mirage, which will be reissued in a deluxe package via Warner Bros. on September 23rd. It's something of an odd statement to make about a record that charted at Number One on the Billboard 200, spawned multiple hit singles and went on to sell more than three million copies. Of course, when you're in Fleetwood Mac, the definition of what constitutes success is relative.

The album, the band's 13th studio effort overall and fourth to feature singer Stevie Nicks and singer/guitarist Lindsey Buckingham alongside longtime members Fleetwood, bassist John McVie and singer/keyboardist Christine McVie, came on the heels of one of the more impressive runs in rock: the lineup's smash 1975 "debut," Fleetwood Mac; the now-more-than-40-million-selling follow-up, Rumours; and the sprawling and sonically adventurous Buckingham-helmed double–LP Tusk (a commercial "failure" that still managed to move several million copies). By the time the band reconvened for Mirage in May 1981, they had been off the road for close to a year, during which time three members had recorded – but not yet released – solo albums (Buckingham's Law and Order, Fleetwood's The Visitor and Nicks' eventual chart-topping, multi-platinum Bella Donna). That time apart, combined with the tensions that had been brought on by the experimental nature of the Tusk album, left them ready to recapture a bit of the old Rumours magic, so to speak.

Full interview with Mick at Rollingstone


The deluxe edition of Mirage is out on September 23rd on Warner Brothers
Mirage (Deluxe) (3CD/1LP/1DVD-Audio)

10 Questions for Christine McVie of Fleetwood Mac

The peacemaker of Fleetwood Mac on Mirage, Maui and missing the buzz
by Ralph Moore
The Arts Desk

theartsdesk meets Christine McVie on a sunny Friday afternoon in September; the Warner Brothers boardroom (with generous hospitality spread) is suitably palatial. We’re the first media interview of the day, so she’s bright and attentive. McVie was always the member of Fleetwood Mac who you’d want to adopt: the most approachably human member of a band constantly at war with itself. Readily admitting that she’s the “peacekeeper’ in the band, the singer/songwriter behind such Mac classics as “Everywhere” and “You Make Loving Fun” is as sweet and serene as you’d hope she would be.

She’s here to promote the new deluxe remaster of 1982 album Mirage – the follow-up to the somewhat deranged 1979 Tusk, which was recorded and released as Christine and John McVie, the band's bassist, were divorcing. She quit the band in 1998 after the hugely successful live album The Dance, after which she started a fairly solitary life of her own in the English countryside for the best part of 16 years. The first four of those, she says, were simply spent working on the house. It was only therapy and the canny, persuasive hand of Mick Fleetwood that coaxed her into returning after a trip to Maui, Hawaii, where Mick lives close to John McVie, his lifelong partner-in-crime.

The former Christine Perfect had a severe fear of flying that she’s now completely beaten, and as we speak, it’s clear that she’s fairly perplexed about having left the fray for so long in the first place. So what was she doing in all that time exactly? “A lot of people ask me that question!” With a brand new album (their first since 2001’s Say You Will) and a new world tour in the planning stages, it’s clear that the Fleetwood Mac story still has several enthralling chapters ahead. Somewhere near Fleetwood's on Front Street – Mick's fancy restaurant in Maui – the drummer must be feeling pretty smug that the ragged band of brothers and sisters he founded are finally back together.

RALPH MOORE: What was the mood of the band post-Tusk?

CHRISTINE McVIE: I remember we did two huge world tours after Tusk. We drove ourselves into the ground physically, and obviously there was a lot of drinking and a lot of drugs, and that just about killed us all, so we took a lot of time off. There was a long time between Tusk and Mirage. Mick went to Ghana to make an album called The Visitor and Stevie [Nicks] made Bella Donna, which was a huge hit for her.

But I think maybe we were under contract so had to make a record at that time, so Mick tried to recreate a similar bubble to Rumours where we were away from our homes, and that’s how that started. The mood? I was quite looking forward to it. We recorded at Honky Ch√Ęteau [the infamous Chateau d'Herouville, located 20 miles north of Paris in the Val d'Oise]. There was a big piano there that Elton John had left there, so that was great. I seem to remember we did a lot of mucking around, playing table tennis. The guys from the French Open came down to visit us and John McEnroe also came down – I think I actually beat him at table tennis one night! It was a funny time. I don’t remember any particular animosity. I'm sure we were under contract to do another record so that was the basis of it. And from that, from little acorns the oak tree grew and it turned into a much nicer experience with some really good songs on it.

You returned to the band in 2014: had the dynamic changed?

Well, I just couldn’t believe that 16 years had actually passed. I mean, quite literally, from the moment I stepped on stage in Dublin to rehearse “Don’t Stop” I knew: the eye contact with all the band members, it was like going home. Truthfully. And they felt the same about me. The circle was complete. Had anything changed? Only technically. Vibe wise, I had Mick looking at me through his cymbals, but there was always that gap there on the stage when I left – they hadn’t filled it up with anyone else. That gap when they were touring without me was there every night. It was such a great feeling.

Is it fair to say that you’re the peacekeeper in the band?

I know Stevie always calls me Mother Earth, so possibly! How do I put this…. I have always been the most sane one of the lot, more down to earth, but I think John’s probably even more down to earth now. Peacekeeper? Yeah, I like that title. I do tend to meander around in the cracks! And do I have to be a peacekeeper now? Only occasionally. You always get moments with Stevie and Lindsey [Buckingham], that’s part of their make-up – they are each other’s muses and they have not been together for years, but they have this love/hate thing that they’ll always have and someone has to gently insinuate in the middle.

But Stevie and I are really good friends, in fact I think we’re better friends now than we were 16 years ago. And it’s a fact, when it's the Buckingham/Nicks show backed by John and Mick, that’s going to cause a lot of tension and stress. But with me in there, it gave Stevie the chance to get her breath back and not have this constant thing going on with Lindsey: her sister was back.

Is it fair to say that Fleetwood Mac is a democracy, but driven for the most part by Mick?

Yes, but you’ve got to have a degree of flexibility. We’re very democratic. If one person is outvoted, you go with it. Mick always says, I’m a drummer, I can’t just sit in a room and play drums, I need a band. So in Maui, he has his own little band and when Fleetwood Mac’s not touring, he plays with them. It keeps him busy.

In the 16 years interim, what were you doing and did you see the band much?

I didn’t see them very much. First of all, I never flew anywhere. I saw them at Earl's Court a few years back and sat at the sound board and that was a weird feeling. But I had no sense at that time of wanting to rejoin and at that time it was a relief – but I didn’t realise what pleasure I was missing until more recent days when I made the phone call to Mick and asked, "What would be it be like if I came back?" Fortunately Stevie was dying for me to come back, as were the rest of the band. Lindsey didn’t believe it would ever happen, but when I walked back onstage he did and they were delirious.

But when I first left, I was married at that point and spent four years restoring the house, a big rambling place with gardens – it was quite a project. But I didn’t write very much and the marriage didn’t work out, and I started to find I was twiddling my thumbs in this huge place, bouncing off the walls. So I thought that I’d do a little solo project. I got together with my nephew who’s a good musician and quite handy with ProTools and I thought, I’ll do a little record because I can’t fly, and I don’t want to tour, so we did that in my garage. And that took a couple of years, because we didn’t have a pressing need to finish it.

And then I sunk into isolation and got in a bit of trouble and sought help, and that was when I called Mick. It was healing and cathartic going back into the band. I missed all that buzz. I was also deluded about some idea of being the country lady with dogs, a Range Rover and Hunter boots, going for long walks, all that. Baking cakes in my Aga. It was not what I wanted in the end.

How did you overcome the fear of flying?

I was starting to realise that I was trapped in England unless I went by train or boat – and that I will never be able to see the world. So I went to a therapist and said, "I have to be able to get on a plane." And he said, "Where would you most like to go?" And I said, "Maui!" And he said, "Buy a first-class ticket. Don’t get on – you have the ticket, that’s the starting point." And as serendipity would have it Mick said, “I am coming to London” and I said, “I have a ticket to Maui!” So he said “Stay there! And we’ll go back together.”

So I went back with Mick to Maui and didn’t even feel the plane taking off, that’s how unafraid I was. I had some pretty good therapy, and I love flying now! And I did some songs with his little band there, and that was the start of it all. It’s the best thing we could have ever done. In many ways, I think we sound better and the audience reaction is better than even it was before. It’s unprecedented in rock ‘n’ roll that someone should leave and rejoin 16 years on and all five of us are still alive and healthy – touch wood and whistle.

Let’s talk about the new album.

I love every single track we’ve done, bar none. This's something to me that is really special. Stevie hasn’t come in on it yet because she’s been busy doing something else. Last year, I was in there with Mick and Lindsey and John – John’s healing very nicely now – and nearly completed seven tracks and they’re magic. Seriously, no padding! I’m going to go over again in October to work on it. Stevie’s on tour but we’ve got until next year to finish it because we’re planning a world tour again, for the summer of '17. I don’t know if I’m privy to give song titles yet, but Lindsey and I have practically co-written everything. Getting the band all together is like herding sheep: to get all five of us in a room is nigh-on impossible. And then somebody will wander out. But it does happen.

And what’s great is Fleetwood Mac is now a genuine, cross-generational experience.

The generation gap is phenomenal! Kids are going, "We’d better see them before one of them dies!" The songs endure. I have lots of friends with growing children, even 12- and 11-year-olds and some of them are avid listeners, they carry Rumours on their iPods! Tango is a favourite and Tusk is a favourite of some the weird 14-year-old boys. The demographic is remarkable.

And you still have the potential to play Glastonbury again.

Yes. I think we have been asked but for whatever reason it hasn’t happened, I don’t know for what reason. Would I love to do it? Love’s a strong word! I wouldn’t mind – so long as we could helicopter in and helicopter out!

Let’s end by returning to Mirage – where does it sit in the Mac canon for you?

If I have to be really truthful, it’s not catalogued as my favourite but on it are some great songs and some really good memories and it harkens in a vague sense not to the soul of Rumours but to more commercial roots after Tusk, which was the antithesis of commercial. On Mirage we made an effort to have a few more catchy songs. But it’s still a pretty eccentric record when you listen to it. It’s nuts!

The deluxe edition of Mirage is out on September 23rd on Warner Brothers

Source The Arts Desk

The deluxe edition of Mirage will be released September 23rd
Mirage (Deluxe) (3CD/1LP/1DVD-Audio)

Monday, September 19, 2016

Stevie Nicks details what fans should look forward to on 24 Karat Gold Tour

Stevie Nicks Talks About Empowering Women, Fleetwood Mac and her Next Tour
by Kyle Stevens
Huffington Post

Legend. Icon. Storyteller.

“I have a super loud voice,” Stevie Nicks said with a laugh. The world is thankful for it. Her voice is necessary in times like these. The future is up in the air and Stevie Nicks has stepped up to the plate to be the heroine we all need. She is taking the show on the road and it will be unlike anything anyone has ever seen before. The 27-city tour starts on October 25th in Phoenix and will travel to places like Atlanta, Toronto, Chicago, Philadelphia, New York City and more. “The 24 Karat Gold Tour” is the next chapter in the mythical career of Stevie Nicks.

In an exclusive interview with The Huffington Post, Nicks went into detail about what fans should look forward to when “The 24 Karat Gold Tour” comes to town. 

Full Interview at Huffington Post

One section of the interview I was really happy to read about are all the Herbert W. Worthington III Photos left behind when he died. I'm glad Stevie is now the owner of them. A lot of amazing shots were taken over the years.

"The guy who took the cover of Rumors, Fleetwood Mac and all of my covers, Herbert W. Worthington III, died last year and he left me everything. He left me every picture he ever took, all the way back to Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Guy and all the Fleetwood Mac stuff. All of the press photo sessions. I have an immense amount of amazing photographs taken by this great photographer who was a dear friend of mine that I can now use."

Friday, September 16, 2016

Christine McVie with MixMag Editor Ralph Moore

Christine was interview this morning (Sept 16th) by Ralph Moore, Editor of MixMag, on the re-
release of Mirage. No word yet on when the interview will be released, but it'll likely be in the next issue since Mirage will be released next week.  She looks great!!

Stevie Nicks shares intimate memories of her longtime friend Prince

Stevie Nicks: ‘My Heart Is With Hillary Clinton’
By  Ian Drew
Us Magazine

The Gold Dust Woman is with her too! During a chat with Us Weekly Entertainment Director Ian Drew about her upcoming 24 Karat Gold tour, Stevie Nicks revealed her pick for the 45th president of the United States: Hillary Clinton.

The ringing endorsement doesn’t come as too much of a surprise. After an extended hiatus, the singer, 68, reunited with her legendary band Fleetwood Mac to perform at the Inaugural Ball for the former secretary of state’s husband, Bill Clinton, in 1993 (the group’s 1977 smash “Don’t Stop” was his campaign theme song).

Nicks previously revealed she’d like to sing her Mac classic “Landslide” if Clinton wins. “I could gather together the Dixie Chicks, Billy Corgan and everybody who’s ever sung a version of ‘Landslide,’” she told The New York Times on September 6.

The “Stand Back” chanteuse, whose 27-city solo tour with the Pretenders kicks off October 25, also shared intimate memories of her longtime friend Prince, who died from an accidental overdose of the opioid fentanyl on April 21.

Us: You recently finished playing 120 shows with Fleetwood Mac and now you are heading out on the road again. Do you ever take a break?

SN: No, and I blame it on my mother. She was a born entertainer. Leave the songwriting, the singing and all that behind, and I still would have found some way to be an entertainer. I would have never been an actress, though, because I realized early in my life, in like sixth grade, I was a terrible actress. But I would have found something because I love to entertain people. I had the option to take the rest of the year off. But I said the songs on my last solo album, 24 Karat Gold, mean so much to me. I need to get out there and sing them.

Us: Why did you decide to tour with Chrissie Hynde and the Pretenders?

SN: When Chrissie Hynde was inducted into the Hall of Fame, I, of course, was there to see that because I have to back up the girl. When it was over, I said we needed to have a party for Chrissie in my hotel suite. I didn’t really know her, but it was great. I got to sit at the piano with her and just talk to her about everything — her family, rock ’n’ roll, the music business. I’ve always been a Pretenders fan, but I got to know her. So I’m very excited about this.

Us: You collaborated with Prince on your 1983 hit “Stand Back.” I assume you’ll be playing that song in his memory?

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Video - Stevie Nicks performing Landslide on America's Got Talent, endorses finalist Grace VanderWaal

Stevie Nicks Praises Grace VanderWaal on 'America's Got Talent': 'She's Got It'
Billboard
by Michele Amabile Angermiller


America's Got Talent finalist Grace VanderWaal got a ringing endorsement from special guest Stevie Nicks on Wednesday (Sept. 14) night's season finale.

The 12-year old singer-songwriter entertained the audience once more with her original audition song, "I Don't Know My Name." VanderWaal brought Nicks to the stage following her performance, introducing her as "a true hero of inspiration."

The former Fleetwood Mac singer returned the compliment after performing a beautiful version of Fleetwood Mac's "Landslide," telling host Nick Cannon that VanderWaal has a bright future.

"I have been watching this show from the very beginning," she said, "I have to say she reminds me a lot of me in a lot of ways. We sing very similar ... we like to be weird and perky and we like to be a little different ... and not like anybody else."

VanderWaal's individuality will take her far.

"She's got it," she said. "Whatever happens Grace is going to the top."

LANDSLIDE:









Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Wednesday's 'America's Got Talent' finale will feature a performance by Stevie Nicks

America's Got Talent will crown a Season 11 champion Wednesday night, but there's already a clear
winner: the show itself.

The NBC talent competition (tonight and Wednesday, 8 ET/PT) is again summer's top-rated program, enjoying its biggest audience in five seasons (an average of 13.7 million viewers, up 10% from last year) and its best performance with young adults since 2013. Besides naming a winner, Wednesday's finale will feature performances by Stevie Nicks, Jersey Boys and Il Volo.



Stevie Nicks to honor Prince during upcoming US tour

By MARK KENNEDY
Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Stevie Nicks is trying to whittle down the set list for her upcoming solo tour, but one song that definitely made the cut is her 1983 hit "Stand Back" with Prince. Originally written as a compliment, now it will be a tribute.

The Fleetwood Mac singer, who heard Prince's "Little Red Corvette" on her car radio and loved it so much she decided to write an answer song, hasn't played "Stand Back" since Prince died in April.

"I will be singing it for the first time without Prince being on the planet," she said. "That is going to be horrible, but it doesn't mean that I don't want to pay homage to my 'Little Red Corvette' friend. I'll sing it forever for him now."

Nicks' two-month tour with The Pretenders kicks off Oct. 25 in support of her 2014 album, "24 Karat Gold: Songs From the Vault." She never got a chance to promote the CD since she spent most of the last three years on the road with Fleetwood Mac.

Nicks promises songs from "24 Karat Gold" as well as old favorites like "Dreams," ''If Anyone Falls," ''New Orleans," ''Bella Donna," ''Rooms on Fire" and "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around."

"Stand Back" will be there, fueled by the memory of her having lured Prince into the recording studio to play keyboards on the song he inspired. She said one of her deepest regrets is never getting him to join her onstage for a live version.

Though Nicks and Prince were friends, the two didn't hang out much. One thing they disagreed on was drug use. "He hated them. And he hated that I did drugs and that's probably why we didn't hang out more," she said.

"He was worried that I would die of an accidental drug overdose and my sadness is that he did die of an accidental drug overdose. He's up there looking down, saying to me, 'Sweetie, I can't believe it happened either.'"

Nicks has no current record deal — "I'm free to do whatever I want" — after delivering "24 Karat Gold" to Warner Bros. It's an album of orphan songs, demos mostly written between 1969-1987.

"These were written during the days when everybody was pretty high and crazy and there was a lot of love affairs going on and a lot of breakups going on and just a lot of emotion going on," she said.

The 68-year-old singer-songwriter said that there were many reasons why the songs never got on any of her albums or those by Fleetwood Mac. In some cases, she didn't like the arrangements and pulled them. Or they came out soulless.

So in 2014, she and producers Dave Stewart and Waddy Wachtel went to Nashville, Tennessee, and re-recorded the songs in a matter of weeks. When they were finished, she put one CD in a gold box, wrapped it in a red bow and delivered it to the front desk of Warner Bros. Then she rejoined the Fleetwood Mac reunion tour.

Now she's getting ready to hit the road again, one of the few legendary acts like the Rolling Stones or Bruce Springsteen to be able to deliver a three- or four-hour set because they never stopped making music.

"I am very aware that artists over 50 don't — and are never going to — sell a lot of albums any more. It took me years to accept that," she said. "Now we can just pretend we're like 15 and start over and make records just because we want to."