Saturday, March 26, 2022

Christine McVie to release new solo album

Christine McVie to release new solo album of reworked Fleetwood Mac tracks



Christine McVie has shared details of her forthcoming album Songbird, containing a compilation of her biggest hits.

Christine McVie has announced that she will be releasing a new solo album featuring re-imagined versions of her biggest hits with Fleetwood Mac. The album will be titled Songbird, after one of the singer's solo compositions on Rumours.

Although no official release date for the album has yet been confirmed, McVie says it will emerge in June.

Exactly which compositions have been reworked for Songbird has not yet been disclosed. Some of McVie's hits with the group include Say You Love Me, You Make Loving Fun, Everywhere and Little Lies.

According to the vocalist, as disclosed in a new interview with Gary Barlow on BBC Radio 2 show We Write the Songs, the project was produced by legendary English studio veteran Glyn Johns (The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, The Who) and features input from Grammy-winning composer and conductor Vince Mendoza.

“I’ve just finished an album which is a compilation of my biggest hits,” she explains. “But they’ve all been produced again by Glyn Johns [with] Vince Mendoza on strings, who does this fantastic version of Songbird. We’ve just now actually re-cut it with a complete string orchestra and it sounds beautiful.”

McVie says that all the re-imagined Fleetwood Mac songs on the album "sound completely different" to their originals. 

When asked if she would consider touring the album, the singer/keyboardist replies, “That I daren’t comment on yet! I’m very cagey about things like that.”

The Fleetwood Mac star last released a solo album in 2004 with In The Meantime, and issued a joint self-titled project with band-member/guitarist Lindsey Buckingham in 2017.

Discussing her reunion with the band in 2014 following a 16 year hiatus, she explains how she rekindled her relationship with her fellow band members. “I just needed to get away,” she said of her departure in 1998.

“I was quite happy for the first eight, 10 years, just living my life in the country in Kent. I had a big old rambling manor house that I lived in, and I was loving my life. 

"Then I just started to kind of miss the band again, and it was actually me who tackled Mick [Fleetwood] and said, ‘How would you feel if I were to come back?’ And he went and spoke to all the other guys because they’d all been still playing this whole time.

"You can quote Lindsay as having said, ‘Well, she better bloody well mean it. If she wants to come back, she better bloody well stay!’ Or something like that. But I did. I went back, and it was great – those final years were great.”

When host Barlow asks whether Fleetwood Mac's most recent tour was their “lap of honour", McVie disagrees.

"None of us know what’s happening with Fleetwood Mac," she notes. "With COVID and everything else, we’ve got to all of us be very careful. But you know, this is not necessarily the end of the tale, so maybe the lap of honour is yet to come."

By Elizabeth Scarlett 












Saturday, February 26, 2022

Stevie Nicks Bella Donna 2LP Set For Record Store Day 2022

BELLA DONNA DOUBLE VINYL SET FOR RELEASE ON RECORD STORE DAY APR 23, 2022





This double vinyl version includes the remastered original album and an LP of studio outtakes, B-sides and demos, many for the first time on vinyl, from the 2016 Bella Donna Deluxe Edition.

TRACKLISTING:

LP1

Side 1
1. Bella Donna (2016 Remaster)
2. Kind of Woman (2016 Remaster)
3. Stop Draggin' My Heart Around (with Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers) [2016 Remaster]
4. Think About It (2016 Remaster)
5. After the Glitter Fades (2016 Remaster)

Side 2
1. Edge of Seventeen (2016 Remaster)
2. How Still My Love (2016 Remaster)
3. Leather and Lace (2016 Remaster) [Remastered]
4. Outside the Rain (2016 Remaster)
5. The Highwayman (2016 Remaster)

LP2

Side 1
1. Edge of Seventeen (Early Take)
2. Think About It (Alternate Version)
3. How Still My Love (Alternate Version)
4. Leather and Lace (Alternate Version)
5. Bella Donna (Demo) (Demo)

Side 2
1. Gold and Braid (Unreleased Version)
2. Sleeping Angel (Alternate Version)
3. If You Were My Love (Unreleased Version)
4. The Dealer (Unreleased Version)
5. Blue Lamp (2016 Remaster)(Heavy Metal Soundtrack)
6. Sleeping Angel (From Fast Times at Ridgemont High) [2016 Remaster]

Quantity 15,000

Tuesday, February 15, 2022

Stevie Nicks Is Still Living Her Dreams

 The New Yorker Interview


Stevie Nicks Is Still Living Her Dreams

The rock-and-roll icon talks about style, spirits, and writing one of her best songs ever.

By Tavi Gevinson

The New Yorker

I first met Stevie Nicks in 2013, when I was about to turn seventeen. At the time, I was editing Rookie, an online magazine for teen girls, and I had recently given a tedxTeen talk critiquing a trend of superficially “strong” female characters in pop culture. I am sure the video would embarrass me now, but I stand by its concluding line: “Just be Stevie Nicks.” A few months later, I heard from Nicks’s management team. Her cousin had sent her the video of my talk, and she wanted to invite me to a Fleetwood Mac show. At the concert, in Chicago, I bawled listening to Nicks sing her otherworldly songs, and was stunned when I heard the same voice dedicating her performance of “Landslide” to me. Backstage, Nicks gave me a gold moon-shaped necklace—a token she grants to those she’s taken under her wing. We kept up a friendship, and, in 2017, I interviewed her for Rookie’s podcast. Then the show’s production company shut down midseason, and the conversation never aired.n company shut down midseason, and the conversation never aired.

In the years since, Nicks’s appeal among younger generations has only grown. On TikTok, her songs provide a soundtrack to viral videos and fans pay tribute to her witchy aesthetic. Artists such as Harry Styles, Miley Cyrus, and Lana Del Rey have asked her to lend her voice to their songs, and she’s become “fairy godmother” to a wide circle of younger artists. For listeners, too, she has always acted as a kind of spiritual guide. In her music, loss is simultaneously earth-shattering and ordinary. Heartbreak is survivable, and possibly a key to self-knowledge. Many of her songs take place at night, in dreams or visions, “somewhere out in the back of your mind.” Her narrator frequently asks questions of herself and of some higher power, as if in constant conversation with her own intuition. When I said “Just be Stevie Nicks,” I was thinking of how her work had taught me to see such sensitivity as a source of strength. Nicks’s music is what you listen to when you need help listening to yourself.

Over two evenings last month, Nicks and I caught up over the phone. She was at her home in Santa Monica, where she has spent the pandemic keeping nocturnal hours and working on a TV series based on the Welsh myth of Rhiannon. When she apologized for asking to speak at 10:30 p.m. E.T., I assured her that I was on a similar schedule. “Good,” she said. “Then we are definitely friends of the night.” This interview has been adapted from our unpublished early conversation and our recent ones.

Friday, November 26, 2021

Q&A Lindsey Buckingham Most Fulfilling and Dysfunctional of His Career

Lindsey Buckingham on the Most Fulfilling and Dysfunctional of His Career
By Devon Ivie - Vulture



It’s long been theorized that it takes two other guitarists to cover one Lindsey Buckingham, which was proved back in 2018 when the fingerpicking deity was unceremoniously fired from Fleetwood Mac and had to be replaced with a duo of rock elders for the band’s ensuing tour. (You thought playing “Never Going Back Again” night after night would be easy?) Unsurprisingly, there was the requisite gossipy domino effect of headlines for the next few years. But after bringing a lawsuit against the rest of the band, the subsequent settlement, his emergency triple bypass surgery, various reconciliations, and a maybe/maybe not divorce from his wife — phew — Buckingham now finds himself in a fulfilled state of mind, enjoying the September release of his newest solo album, Lindsey Buckingham. During a break in his touring schedule, Buckingham spoke from his California home about the highest highs and lowest lows of his career. Oh yeah, and about Stevie Nicks.

Most underappreciated Fleetwood Mac song

TUSK

It wasn’t so much about the song than it was the whole album Tusk and the fact that everyone was expecting Rumours II. We gave them something totally different. When Tusk came out with the song and the album, people either got why we did it and appreciated the departure we’d made, or it alienated them. You might make the case for saying that Rumours as an album was overrated, and it wasn’t. It was just the success detached from the music, and it became about the success at some point. You lose maybe a certain faction of people when you move that far to the left.

I always joke that I would’ve loved to have been a fly on the wall when Warner Bros. first sat down in their boardroom and put the whole album on and played it collectively. And they were probably going, What the hell is this? Because they didn’t really know what they were getting. I think that that was probably part of the reaction from part of the audience too — it was alienating in a certain way, which ultimately turned out to be constructive. I think Tusk has stood the test of time and it’s one that resonates with fellow artists more in a lot of ways. It also has become understood in terms of why it was done and is appreciated for that. But in the moment, it definitely divided up the room.

Guitar solo that makes your fingers hurt the most

BIG LOVE

The stage version of “Big Love.” [Laughs.] It was the first single from Tango in the Night, but it was an ensemble piece at the time. That was one of the things that began to evolve after I left the band — I realized I wanted to try to address that finger style in a more complete way. “Big Love” evolved from what it had been as an ensemble to a single guitar-and-voice piece onstage and became the template idea for quite a few other songs to follow, in terms of making the statement both onstage and on recordings. Like, basically having one guitar do the work of a whole track, and wanting to include that as one approach in the making of an album. I don’t think it ever got more rigorous than “Big Love” with the actual demands of the part required. It’s a finger-hurter, for sure.

I don’t really do any finger exercises, by the way. I have no discipline whatsoever other than to remain calm and centered and just trust that my impulses are going to be correct. All around me in Fleetwood Mac, you could hear through the walls of the dressing rooms, people going, La, la, la, la, la, la, stuff like that. I was never interested in vocal exercises. I would hear Mick Fleetwood trying to play the guitar to keep himself calm so that he wouldn’t be too nervous. I was blessed with never having been nervous going onstage. I think by virtue of that, I never felt like I needed to prepare on a nightly basis in any way, whether it was vocally or exercises for the guitar. I just go out there, plug it in, and hopefully become psychically plugged in as well.

Most fulfilling album

INTERVIEW Lindsey Buckingham Talks About His Process of Recording

Lindsey Buckingham: Staying Grounded & Creative
BY LARRY CRANE - NOVEMBER, 2021


Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours came out right before I started high school. I remember most of my graduating class (not including me!) singing “Dreams” at our ceremony in a park by a local creek. Growing up in Northern California, we knew that two members of the band, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, had come from our neck of the woods, and watching the group become one of the biggest selling rock bands ever was dizzying. When they came out with Tusk a little over two years later, I bought the double LP and absorbed it like teenagers do. I knew something different was going on with these songs, but it was years before I realized what Lindsey Buckingham was doing, and why someone would find creativity in a home studio they might not otherwise. Lindsey’s new self-titled album, written, produced, mixed, and recorded in his home studio, is another classic example of his best work, and it was an honor to talk to him about his process.

Tape Op is about music recording in all kinds of scenarios. Ever since I started it, you’ve been in the back of my mind as the perfect interview. 

Well, I do have my own methods; that’s for sure! [laughter]

Exactly. I wanted to talk to you a bit about all of your various personal recording scenarios.

Sure.

It’s well-known that a lot of home recording happened around the Tusk era, but did you have home recording setups before that, in the Buckingham/Nicks era, or in the Bay Area before that?

I did. When I was a late teenager and was in the band [Fritz] up in Northern California – that Stevie [Nicks] and I were both in, I was playing bass – I had an old commercial Sony 2-track. It had that sound-on-sound feature, where you could take one recording, say on the left channel, and then bounce it over to the right channel as you were recording something over it. I could begin to get a multitrack effect, one track at a time, which is pretty much the way that Les Paul [Tape Op #50] did it. That was his method and example that probably hit home with me. Then, a little bit later, probably about when I was 20 or 21, I acquired an Ampex AG-440 4-track, which obviously still had limitations. But hey, The Beatles cut Sgt. Pepper’s… on those, so it opened up the whole idea. It gave me much more flexibility. I was already into what I would call that “painting process” as early as that point, where I was putting things down all by myself, and doing the architecture around a song.

Did that influence the way you arrange guitars? I’ve interviewed Ken Caillat [Tape Op #96] before about how you put little filigrees and figures in; sometimes they are very simple parts to build a whole.

Right. Well, so much of my function in Fleetwood Mac was to take raw material and fashion it into a sound. I had the vision to do that, and I apparently had the tools to do that. Much of that was based around having a ground-up familiarity with a self-sufficiency, if you will; doing it myself and then bringing that into a more communal arena, for sure. So yeah, absolutely.

Did you have a home setup around the time of the self-titled Fleetwood Mac album?

When we first joined Fleetwood Mac, all of Stevie’s songs and my songs were already demoed out on my AG-440. That album only took a few months to do, and part of that was Keith Olsen [Tape Op #33] being in control of the engineering, as well as overseeing that things didn’t get too – shall we say? – self-indulgent. There was a lot at stake for them, because they were almost ready to be booted by Warner [Bros.] before we joined. They’d had so many non sequitur albums. The ability to make that album so quickly was largely due to the fact that all of Stevie’s and my material had been blocked out. What you hear on the record would be very close to what the demos were like, of course without John [McVie] and Mick [Fleetwood] as the rhythm section. I didn’t get a 24-track until a bit later, until there was a little bit more money coming in. Somewhere in the middle of the Rumours process is when I probably got one.

Right. That must have been a big step. A 24-track tape deck is nothing without a console, and then you need speakers and something to mix to.

I first got a 24-track and the machine at my house, [the one] that I did most of the work on my songs that ended up on Tusk. I would start these tracks as paintings, and then discover and find something which was a little bit more to the left. Then I’d bring them in for the band to add to. What’s funny is that I did not have a proper console at that time. I had enough channels to be able to play everything [back] at once, but it wasn’t a large thing. It was more or less something you’d take on the road. I didn’t get a proper console until maybe 1985 or ‘86, when I put one into my studio in my house up in Bel Air, and that’s the console I still have.

Saturday, October 02, 2021

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM ALBUM CHARTS

Lindsey Buckingham released his self titled new album September 17th and it's a great album if you haven't checked it out. How did the album do in it's first week on the Album charts around the world? Here's what I've found.


DEBUT POSITION   COUNTRY
#6  SCOTLAND
#8  UK (Top 40 Vinyl Albums Chart)
#25  UK
#37  GERMANY
#39  GERMANY (albums download chart)
#60  SWITZERLAND
#65  IRELAND
#99 debut #57 Week 2  BELGIUM (Flanders)
#173 debut #180 Week 2  BELGIUM (WalloniĆ«)

UNITED STATESVARIOUS ALBUM CHARTCHART EXPLANATION
#6 Tastemaker Albums Chart Albums ranked based on "an influential panel of
indie stores and small regional chains

#13

Top Album Sales Chart  A pure album sales chart.

#12

Top Current Album Sales Chart The same chart as Top Album Sales, with catalog
titles removed
#37 Top Rock Albums Chart Most popular rock albums of the week, compiled by
Nielsen Music. Based on multi-metric consumption
(blending traditional album sales, track equivalent
albums, and streaming equivalent albums)


PEAK POSITION ON iTUNES ALBUMS CHARTS
#7   - CANADA (itunes)
#9   - USA (itunes)
#10 - UK 9 (itunes)
#23 - AUSTRALIA (itunes)
#33 - GERMANY (itunes)

Saturday, September 18, 2021

REVIEWS "LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM" May well make Fleetwood Mac think again.


Fleetwood Mac’s former guitarist goes his own way, but treads old ground

by Barry Divola
⭐⭐1/2

Sometimes the soap opera threatens to obscure the music. Case in point: Fleetwood Mac. The drugs, the affairs, the infighting, the walkouts and the reconciliations have become part of the band narrative, most recently in 2018 when, after increasing tensions in the group, Lindsey Buckingham was fired and replaced with Neil Finn and Mike Campbell for live shows. He’s taken his ball, gone home and made his first solo album in a decade.

Buckingham was always the weirdly shaped peg in the Mac machine while they helped create the ’70s US West Coast FM-rock universe. When he was given free rein on the band’s 1979 opus Tusk, the world discovered he was more enamoured with the left-field experimentation of Brian Wilson or Todd Rundgren: mercurial musicians and maverick producers with highly individual visions of how songs should sound.

This self-titled disc softly treads the same ground he has been covering for a while now – close-miked guitar played in his distinctive finger-picked style, lead vocals in his high, breathy register, layers of gossamer harmonies and beats that twitch and fidget. Case in point is first single I Don’t Mind, a sparkly wisp of a thing that rhymes willow with pillow and broken arrow with straight and narrow, while you’re left wondering how it might sound with Mick Fleetwood providing a big beat and Stevie Nicks cutting through with her white-winged dove vocals.

Remember, this is a man whose best-known solo hit, 1981’s Trouble, was a Vaseline-lensed soft-rock song he introduced with a repeated “two, a-three, a-four” count-in as if he was imitating Cookie Monster. Buckingham shoots for The Everly Brothers on the echo-laden Blind Love and constructs an aural Venn diagram where Paul Simon and Roy Orbison intersect on Time, but there’s a compressed and boxy aura around the production, while Swan Song threatens motion sickness with the strobe-like effect of fluttering Spanish guitars rubbing up against a beat with a case of the jitters.

The solo in On the Wrong Side proves he can still pull off the licks with ease, even if the song’s thin sound doesn’t match his virtuosity. Is it wrong to wish Buckingham would let it hang out again and build on the legacy of Go Your Own Way, a song that rocked and shimmered so majestically? Maybe that’s a place he no longer wishes to revisit, but these songs suggest yet another Mac reconciliation could be in order.

Lindsey Buckingham’s latest solo venture is a statement of intent

By Elizabeth Aubrey
September 16, 2016

Lindsey Buckingham – Lindsey Buckingham
⭐⭐⭐/5

It’s been a tumultuous few years for Lindsey Buckingham. After being fired from Fleetwood Mac in 2018, he had to undergo life-saving, open-heart surgery in 2019 and then the pandemic hit. Buckingham called it “a trifecta of events that were completely off the charts” – which is, perhaps, putting it mildly. Despite his troubles, Buckingham’s seventh studio album is far from a dour, downbeat affair. In fact, it’s quite the opposite.

Take early album track, “On The Wrong Side”. While it seems to address his acrimonious break-up with the band –“I’m outta pity,”he repeatedly croons – it’s an upbeat, stripped-back pop song which culminates in one of Buckingham’s signature, stomping electric guitar solos – and shows Fleetwood Mac just what they’re missing.

Drum machine led “Swan Song” is the album’s most inventive and surprising song, proving that the creator of “Tusk” has still got his knack for innovation and creating a daring pop hook.

While the weakest tracks here tend to veer into self-pity – the reflective, gentle and Searchers-like “Time” is a good example when Buckingham sings, “Some folks treat me mean”, these moments are usually short-lived. Buckingham is better when looking ahead, with purpose, as on the harmonious “Power Down”.

The self-title here feels like a statement of intent and with a strong solo offering like this, it may well make Fleetwood Mac think again.


Lindsey Buckingham’s latest album is a pop sensibility of precision
The ex-Fleetwood Mac star opines about his tumultuous relationship with former bandmates, but the music is poised and vibrant.

Ludovic Hunter-Tilney 
⭐⭐⭐/5

Fleetwood Mac haven’t released new music since 2013. They have become a behemoth of the nostalgia circuit, trading lucratively on past glories. But although the songs have dried up, the quarrels continue. 

The latest outbreak of arguing in their long and disputatious history has been triggered by the arrival of the new solo album from Lindsey Buckingham, who was fired from the Mac’s ranks in 2018. He is still bristling at being expelled from the band that he helped turn into superstars in the 1970s. His feelings of hurt are chiefly directed at his former creative foil and ex-romantic partner, Stevie Nicks.

“Has the queen lost her sight?” he sings in “Swan Song”, one of Lindsey Buckingham’s 10 tracks. The apparent jibe at Nicks’s poor eyesight since childhood is compounded by verses evoking bitterness at being cast into limbo while the band toured in 2018 and 2019, which was rumoured beforehand to be a farewell. “Is it right to keep me waiting in the shadow of our swan song?” he choruses. His breathy voice belies a needling tone of self-pity. 

Buckingham blames Nicks for kicking him out of Fleetwood Mac. In recent interviews, the 71-year-old has compared her to Donald Trump and speculated that she was jealous about his starting a family in his late 40s while she remained childless. Nicks riposted with a statement denying that she had him fired and repudiating the bitter suggestion of ill-feeling at his becoming a father. 

There is a toxic quality to Buckingham’s resentment — especially in light of allegations that he behaved abusively towards Nicks when they were a couple, as claimed in Stephen Davis’s 2017 biography of Nicks, Gold Dust Woman. But whatever the shortcomings of its maker, and despite a troubled gestation, Lindsey Buckingham is not itself a poisonous experience. 

Recorded in 2018, the album’s release was delayed by the fallout from Buckingham’s Fleetwood Mac ousting and then a heart attack in 2019. Lyrics about the ups and downs in a relationship have acquired an unfortunate significance after he and his wife Kristen Messner separated earlier this year. Yet Buckingham’s gifts as a songwriter and performer cut through the surrounding noise.


The music was recorded at his home studio in Los Angeles, with Buckingham playing all the instruments. It has been crafted with customary attention to detail and ear for melody, a pop sensibility of precision, concision and escapism. The result is a set of four-minute songs that try to find the sweet spot between simplicity and complexity, and often succeed in doing so. 

Opening track “Scream” is a nocturnal erotic reverie set to a thrumming guitar rhythm, pounding drums and chanted choruses, a pocket-sized version of arena rock, at once curtailed and expansive. “On the Wrong Side” is based on a contrast between a tightly metronomic beat and exuberant synths and guitar solos. Layers of vocalisations and instrumentation are arranged with an acute sense of space and action. 

Buckingham’s smoothly hoarse voice glides through these often fast-paced songs at a cruise-control tempo. Although the recordings were made before he sustained vocal damage during open-heart surgery in 2019, they betray the effects of time on his singing. Exertion is rationed. Lyrics are a mixture of clichĆ© (“The future’s looking bright”) and cynicism (“Business and murder, they go hand in hand”). With the mawkish exception of “Dancing”, the music is poised and vibrant. It keeps afloat amid the wreckage of Buckingham’s Fleetwood Mac career. 

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM Takes Us Behind The Music

Lindsey Buckingham breaks down 10 of his best guitar riffs
The man who's always gone his own way takes us behind the music.


By Maureen Lee Lenker 

Lindsey Buckingham has had a tumultuous few years, from his firing from Fleetwood Mac to undergoing emergency open heart surgery to his wife's recent filing for divorce. But the veteran rocker's new solo album, out Friday, probes quieter moments, engaging with the relationship questions that have always made his work soar. And it sings with Buckingham's distinctive California pop-rock, fingerpicking style.

In honor of the album's release, Buckingham, widely considered one of the greatest guitarists of all time, goes back again to give us the stories behind his most memorable songs and epic guitar riffs.

Buckingham originally wrote this hard-rock song, atypical of Fleetwood Mac's style at the time, for his album with then-girlfriend and creative partner, Stevie Nicks. "We'd been in LA only for like a year and a half," he explains. "Things happened pretty fast. The album came out, and it didn't really connect and we were working material for a second album."

All of Buckingham and Nicks' songs that ended up on their first collaboration with Fleetwood Mac were demoed before they ever joined the band. "It made the process of cutting that first album much easier than it would've otherwise been, working with people we'd never worked with before," he notes.

Buckingham based "Afraid" off musical themes he'd heard in church music, singing in a boys' choir at the age of 10 or 11. "It was an exploration into two things. One, into the use of a guitar as a very orchestral thing with a triad of melody going on. And then, the unleashing of the solo at the end, which grew into epic proportions over the years on stage.... It also addressed the yin-yang of having confidence and having faith that you have something to offer in a somewhat tenuous environment that is the entertainment industry, And yet, there's always a fear underneath that."

REVIEW Lindsey Buckingham is an upbeat, frequently delightful album 8/10


Lindsey Buckingham tips his hat to ’60s pop on solo album
By Sam Richards
8/10

After what nearly amounted to a Fleetwood Mac reunion album with 2017’s Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, the first solo album from Lindsey Buckingham in a decade sounds as if it could have been the second disc of the fine 2011 solo release Seeds We Sow.

That isn’t a bad thing at all; far from it. The new self-titled album is full of songs that meld pop hooks ranging from pleasant to glorious with instrumentation—layers of acoustic guitars, in particular—that give the songs a subtle edge while maintaining, even magnifying, their sweetness.

Where Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie seemed to be striving for the sound of the late 1970s and mid-1980s glory years of Fleetwood Mac, the new solo album turns back inward. Lindsey Buckingham, like most of Seeds We Sow, is a true solo effort, with the guitarist playing all the instruments and doing all the singing. And if there’s a lack of the immediacy of his classics like “Go Your Own Way,”  “Monday Morning” or “Big Love,” there’s a depth of musicality that hits just as fast, if not quite as hard.

REVIEW Lindsey Buckingham Fresh Songs with a Classic Mac Sound

Lindsey Buckingham album review: Fresh songs with a classic Mac sound
If we ever get bored of those greatest hits, this will be a handy addition to the canon



By David Smyth

⭐⭐⭐⭐/5

Over four decades since the release of their biggest album, the world seems hungrier than ever for the music of Fleetwood Mac. The turbulent band’s greatest hits collection, 50 Years – Don’t Stop, has been in the UK top 20 all year, while that giant album, Rumours, is at 22 today – its 905th week on the chart. Possible explanatory factors include the death of founding member Peter Green last year, and the band’s song Dreams appearing in a viral TikTok video, but more likely it’s just that these sounds of the Seventies don’t appear to lose any appeal across the generations. Queen, Elton John and the newly recording ABBA are also in the top 20 this week, so it can’t just be your mum playing them for the 905th time.

Fresh music is thinner on the ground, however. The closest we’ve come to a new Fleetwood Mac album since 2003 was a 2017 recording that featured four main members, but not Stevie Nicks, and ended up being called Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie. Nicks was also responsible for the ousting of Buckingham from the band before their last tour, across 2018 and 2019, in what was reportedly an “either he goes or I do” situation.

As Rumours proved, the friction between these former lovers often makes for the best music. However, there’s not much on his seventh solo album to suggest that Buckingham is still taking inspiration from that particular battle. I Don’t Mind, with lines such as: “Where there’s joy there must be sorrow/Never far apart,” is more likely about Kristen Messner, who filed for divorce from him after two decades of marriage this summer. In any case he sounds magnanimous in the song, which easily replicates his classic sound with its bright plucked acoustic melody and breathy female backing vocals.

As long as they’re not taking sides, Mac fans will find lots to love here, including the bucking guitar solo on the racing On the Wrong Side and the sweet, easygoing chorus of Santa Rosa. There’s not much evidence of ageing in the 71-year-old’s weightless voice. There are a few missteps – the restless electronic beats of Swan Song might be intended to keep up with modern times but in fact make it sound more dated, and the closing ballad, Dancing, is a dreary finale. But if there’s ever a chance that people tire of those greatest hits, this is an appealing minor addition to the canon. 

REVIEW Lindsey Buckingham bustles with defiant spirit while leaning heavily on deeply catchy songwriting

Fleetwood Mac visionary’s stellar return

The artist's first solo album in a decade sticks to the world-beating path he’s mastered, drawing on love and lost relationships along the way.


⭐⭐⭐⭐/5
By Rhys Buchanan

Recent world events have proved deeply frustrating for musicians of all levels – even those once central to one of the ​​best-selling groups of all time. The long dark tunnel stretches further back for Lindsey Buckingham though; after being fired from Fleetwood Mac in 2018, the visionary then faced life-saving emergency open-heart surgery in 2019 before the pandemic even hit.

He described the three life-changing punches as “a trifecta of events that were completely off the charts.” It’s no wonder then, that Buckingham finds himself picking through the rubble as well as seeking light on his seventh solo studio album ‘Lindsey Buckingham’. On his first solo studio effort post-Mac, he’s intent on staying grounded musically and emotionally.

The buoyant opener ‘Scream’ feels a fitting way to kick things off – the swift and sweet track gleefully casts those difficult and stormy days away. A sense of abandon cuts through the driving acoustic melody with innocent simplicity through the lyricism: “Lost in the language of your touch / Just like you’re wakin’ from the dream / Oh, I love you when you scream.”

One of the record’s most enchanting moments comes early on with ‘I Don’t Mind’. A figure who has been embroiled in drama and heartache throughout his career, it’s no secret that Buckingham can pen an impacting love song. The track floats with masterful melodies as the lyricism elegantly picks apart the struggles and compromise of a long-term relationship.

He’s just as effective when dealing with the more notable long-term relationship that came crashing to an acrimonious end. The rhythmic anthem of ‘On The Wrong Side’ deals with the feelings of his split with Fleetwood Mac: “I’m outta pity / I’m outta time / Another city, another crime / I’m on the wrong side”, he sings before cutting loose with a soaring emotionally charged guitar solo. There’s definitely some healing going on here.

Even the most casual Fleetwood Mac fans won’t have to look hard to uncover the band’s classic hallmarks, which are dotted all over the listen. ‘Swan Song’ packs the deep velvety guitar textures once heard during the ‘Tango In The Night’ era; elsewhere ‘Power Down’ showcases the effortless grandeur of the timeless finger-picking behind their biggest hits.

The album bustles with defiant spirit while leaning heavily on deeply catchy songwriting and production. And with Mick Fleetwood having reconciled with Buckingham back in March, it’s exactly the kind of triumphant return that could give his old band food for thought.

Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham chooses the light over the fight


REVIEW

BRAD WHEELER
September 16, 2021

Drake and Kanye West are feuding. Meanwhile, Stevie Nicks says: “Hold my shawl.”

In the days leading up to the release of ex-bandmate Lindsey Buckingham’s new self-titled album, the fractious former Fleetwood Mac couple were once again in discord. In 2018, the latter was booted off a Fleetwood Mac tour he wanted to postpone in order to accommodate a solo tour of his own.

In a recent interview with Rolling Stone, Buckingham blamed his dismissal from the band on Nicks, his long-ago partner. “I think she wanted to shape the band in her own image, a more mellow thing – and if you look at the last tour, I think that’s true,” he said.

In response, Nicks released a statement to the magazine: “To be exceedingly clear, I did not have him fired. I did not ask for him to be fired; I did not demand he be fired.” If one reads between the lines, the suggestion is that Nicks had nothing to do with Buckingham’s dismissal.

Has anyone thought of bringing in the comparatively harmonic Oasis brothers Liam and Neil Gallagher to mediate the latest Fleetwood Mac he-said/she-said? Probably not. “Now here you go again, you say you want your freedom,” as a great song once put it.

Which brings us to the eponymous seventh solo studio album by singer-guitarist Buckingham. It’s an acoustic, melodically agreeable affair with contemplative lyrics and restrained production. It’s deeply El Segundo – one is compelled to move West, hire an agent and embrace the earthquakes. The fury of something like Fleetwood Mac’s Big Love just isn’t there.

Don’t be misled by the title of the opening song: Scream is a good scream, a gratified scream. “Nighttime’s the time I love so much, lost in the language of your touch,” Buckingham sings, his voice drenched in familiar reverb. It sounds like it could have been written for a Fleetwood Mac album – and maybe it was.

The verse of I Don’t Mind is a more whispery Nirvana, but the chorus is sweet and sun-drenched. Though the third track On the Wrong Side is more up-tempo, its mood is wistful. Pretty guitar solos wind down to their destinations, like a top-down coupe on a coastal highway. Being on the wrong side of 70 seems to be what the 71-year-old is contemplating:

Time is rolling down the road

Now goes right in a hearse

We were young and never old

Who can tell me which is worse?

There’s a retro vibe at work. Blind Love is dreamy pop from the Ricky Nelson era, and a haunting cover of the sixties folk song Time (originally recorded by the Pozo-Seco Singers) conjures a Roy Orbison-Brian Wilson duet.

There are moments of cocaine-fueled tangos. And Santa Rosa could be a breakup song. Still, there’s more gentle resignation than fight to the record. The word “compromise” even comes up. One might even say the album is mellow – the same adjective Buckingham used to describe Nicks’s vision of the modern-day Fleetwood Mac.

Seems like someone’s made a breakthrough here.